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Office: 8229 Boone Blvd. Suite 280 Lincolnia, VA 22182 Hours Open Monday through Friday 9AM to 5PM

Help Reverse Cognitive Decline with

Bredesen Protocol Alzheimers Treatment in Lincolnia, VA

There's no way around it: Getting diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease can be both scary and disheartening for patients and their loved ones. The cognitive impairment, memory loss, and eventual cognitive decline can seem like a grim prognosis. Unfortunately, the standard reductionist approach seeking to identify a single silver bullet cure doesn't account for the multifactorial nature of Alzheimer's disease.

That's why treating Alzheimer's disease requires a multifaceted response from functional medicine. While there is no single drug that can cure Alzheimer's, protocols addressing the nuanced factors contributing to the disease can make a difference. That's where Proactive Wellness Centers and Bredesen protocol treatment in Lincolnia, VA comes into play.

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Bredesen Protocol Alzheimers Treatment Lincolnia, VA

The Proactive Wellness Approach to Brain Health

At Proactive Wellness, we firmly believe that brain health is an essential part of your overall well-being. However, despite the emergence of new research, there has been limited understanding of how to promote brain health effectively. This includes reducing the risk of dementia/Alzheimer's and stabilizing cognitive decline in patients with early symptoms. Dr. Lawson, an esteemed Bredesen Protocol practitioner and ReCode 2.0 Certified with 17 years of experience in functional medicine can identify and address the root cause of cognitive decline in you or your loved one.

Dr. Lawson's goal isn't to replace the role of family physicians. Rather, we collaborate with primary care physicians, internists, and other medical professionals to provide a comprehensive approach to care. We believe that every individual is unique from a physiological perspective, and therefore, we avoid a one-size-fits-all approach. Instead, our programs focus on a customized approach, addressing risk factors that, if avoided or modified, could have beneficial effects for men and women who have dementia.

Our programs have a strong emphasis on slowing down and reversing the aging process, preventing diseases, and treating chronically ill patients. To achieve this, we employ a three-pronged approach:

  • We empower patients with the knowledge they need to manage their health and attain optimal well-being.
  • We prioritize disease prevention by conducting a thorough evaluation with the help of comprehensive diagnostics and the patient's health history form.
  • We collaborate with patients to implement a rejuvenation program that includes various science-based treatments, like our Brain Health Optimization Program (BHOP) for people suffering from dementia and Alzheimer's

One of the most popular and effective programs we offer includes Bredesen protocol treatment in Lincolnia VA. This revolutionary approach to dementia has provided hope and improved cognitive function for countless people in the US. But to understand the importance of the Bredesen protocol, it's important that you first understand dementia, Alzheimer's, and its effect on people across the world.

The Wide-Reaching Effects of

Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia

There are currently more than 5.8 million individuals in the United States who are living with Alzheimer's disease. It is predicted that the number of individuals with Alzheimer's disease will more than double by 2050.

Dementia is a type of cognitive decline that affects mental abilities. There are many different causes and complex layers involved. Cognitive impairment is characterized by abnormal results on tests measuring memory, speech, critical thinking, and other cognitive abilities, but individuals with this diagnosis are still capable of performing daily activities such as bathing, dressing, and eating. Without proper treatment, Alzheimer's disease is likely to follow within a few years. Alzheimer's disease is the most prevalent form of dementia, and it is diagnosed through neuro-imaging and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid.

In the past, being diagnosed with Alzheimer's was often worse than receiving a death sentence. It was dehumanizing and stripped individuals of their memories, thinking abilities, and independence. However, after three decades of research, we now have a greater understanding of this devastating illness and even solutions like Bredesen protocol treatment in Lincolnia, VA that can help patients deal with dementia.

Bredesen Protocol Alzheimers Treatment Lincolnia, VA

What Causes Dementia?

Dementia is caused by a normal and healthy brain process that malfunctions due to a toxic environment, inflammation, and a lack of necessary nutrients and hormones. The brain's defense mechanism produces amyloid plaques, which serve as a protective helmet around the brain. Unfortunately, these plaques destroy connections between nerve cells, ultimately affecting comprehension, recollection, and clarity.

Bredesen Protocol Alzheimers Treatment Lincolnia, VA

Dementia by the Numbers

It's important to understand the impact of Alzheimer's disease (AD) around the world. According to the CDC, AD is present in 50% of patients in nursing homes and causes more than 110,000 deaths annually in the US. It was the 6th leading cause of death in 2015. More than 5 million people in the US are affected by AD, and recent data indicates that the problem is getting worse.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 47 million people around the world are currently living with dementia, and this number is expected to rise to 75 million by 2030 and 132 million by 2050. Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, accounting for 60 to 80 percent of all cases.

While reading those statistics can be disheartening, there's reason to be hopeful. New therapies and treatments offered at Proactive Wellness - like Bredesen protocol treatment - can help patients deal with dementia and cognitive decline.

Bredesen Protocol Alzheimers Treatment Lincolnia, VA

The Power of

Bredesen Protocol Treatment in Lincolnia, VA

The Bredesen Protocol is a highly personalized treatment program that aims to reverse cognitive decline and improve brain function in patients. Dr. Bredesen has designed the protocol to be adaptable and customizable, tailored to the specific symptoms and needs of each patient.

The program is centered around lifestyle changes, medication, and nutritional adjustments, all of which are tailored to address the unique symptoms and environmental factors that may be contributing to cognitive decline. This approach, referred to as ReCODE, helps patients to combat brain fog and prevent the onset of dementia.

It has also helped patients improve cognitive function significantly, reverse symptoms, and even return to work. The ReCODE program comprises lifestyle interventions, therapeutic diets, and targeted nutrients. Proactive Wellness Centers is thrilled to offer this promising treatment modality for Alzheimer's disease to benefit our patients.

It all starts with a baseline Bredesen evaluation at our wellness clinic in Lincolnia, VA.

Baseline Bredesen Evaluation from

Proactive Wellness Centers

At Proactive Wellness Centers, we have two ways to help patients who are in search of Bredesen protocol treatment in Lincolnia, VA. The first option is our Baseline Bredesen Evaluation, which is best suited for asymptomatic patients - that is, individuals who do not exhibit any significant cognitive decline beyond what is expected with age. Dr. Bredesen classifies such patients as "PreCode."

This evaluation serves as a starting point for PreCode patients, as well as those who are unsure of their cognitive status and potential risk factors. Our baseline evaluation includes the following:

The first step involves conducting a comprehensive set of baseline labs to evaluate your overall health, closely following the Bredesen protocol. This step goes beyond standard labs that you might have for a physical. It includes tests for magnesium, zinc, and selenium levels, B6, B12, and folate levels, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid levels.

It also includes

  • Pre-Diabetes Evaluation
  • Hormone Level Evaluation
  • Thyroid Level Evaluation
  • Specific Immune Marker Evaluation such as TH1, TH2, IL6, and TNF.

Our goal with this assessment is to establish a starting point and compare your cognitive function against what is typical for your age group. We have chosen to use the CNS Vital Signs cognitive assessment, which is widely recognized as one of the best in the industry. Additionally, we will be conducting the standard MoCA test as part of the evaluation.

A DNA test is performed to identify the specific APOE genotype present in your DNA. APOE e4 has been shown to be associated with an increased chance of late-onset Alzheimer's disease, which occurs after a person is 65 years old.

This step covers your lab results and includes a detailed plan of action to address areas of improvement as identified in your baseline evaluation.

Bredesen Protocol Alzheimers Treatment Lincolnia, VA

What are the Early Signs of

Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease?

As we grow older, it can be difficult to distinguish between normal changes in our cognitive abilities and the initial signs of dementia. The issue with preventing chronic illnesses is that we often believe we are healthy as long as we don't experience any symptoms, but this is not entirely accurate. Symptoms are typically the last indicator of a disease, meaning it has already progressed by the time they appear.

While it's always best to catch diseases before you notice symptoms, taking proactive measures at the first sign of cognitive changes can greatly impact the aging of your brain and body. It's crucial to act immediately if you're experiencing the following symptoms of Mild Cognitive Impairment. That way, ,you have a better chance of preventing the development of Alzheimer's.

Bredesen Protocol Alzheimers Treatment Lincolnia, VA

Roughly 10% of individuals with MCI progress to Alzheimer's annually.

Fortunately, Bredesen protocol treatment in Lincolnia, VA may provide you with a chance to delay or even reverse these symptoms

Memory Issues

Memory Issues

You have a hard time remembering events that happened recently, such as appointments or important conversations with loved ones. You may also have trouble remembering important information.

Language Issues

Language Issues

You have trouble finding relevant words when you're talking with other people. You may also have problems following along with complex or complicated discussions.

Maintaining Concentration

Difficulty Maintaining Concentration and Attention

You have noticed a reduced ability to focus and stay honed in on most tasks. You may also not be able to multitask effectively, and it may be harder to keep your attention for long periods of time.

Decline in Executive Functions

Decline in Executive Functions

This symptom involves difficulty with skills like decision-making, planning, problem-solving, and organizing. These difficulties are often most apparent in day-to-day activities.

Visuospatial Awareness

Problems with Visuospatial Awareness

You may have trouble parking your car, judging distances, reading maps, or completing tasks that necessitate spatial orientation.

Impaired Judgement

Impaired Judgement and Reasoning

This may include problems when making judgments or decisions. Examples may consist of difficulties making financial decisions, managing finances, making reasonable and appropriate social decisions, or thinking through risky situations.

Bredesen Protocol Alzheimers Treatment Lincolnia, VA

By contrast, some of the most common signs of normal aging can include the following

Experiencing temporary lapses in memory, where recently learned details like names or scheduled events may slip from one's mind but can be remembered later on

  • You occasionally make mistakes, but nothing that stands out as significant or unusual.
  • You have to ask for help putting together or setting up electronic devices or equipment.
  • You sometimes forget what day it is but have the ability to remember the correct date later on.
  • Your vision is getting worse, which is caused by cataracts.
  • You experience shortness of breath or get tired more often when being active.
  • You feel unusual aches and pains, especially during poor weather.
  • You get confused sometimes but don't have an inability to make decisions or multitask.
  • You have a hard time keeping your body temp regulated.
  • You get angry or frustrated when tasks aren't completed in certain ways.

Your Trusted Choice for Bredesen Protocol Treatment in Lincolnia, VA

Maintaining a healthy brain is crucial for one's overall well-being, yet there remains a lack of knowledge when it comes to promoting brain health, reducing the likelihood of dementia, or managing symptoms for those exhibiting early warning signs.

That's why we're excited to offer patients the ReCODE program at Proactive Wellness Centers. Developed by Doctor Bredesen, this treatment has shown remarkable success in improving cognitive function and even reversing symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. This comprehensive program includes lifestyle changes, dietary interventions, and specialized nutrients, and we are eager to provide this promising treatment option to patients like you.

If you or a loved one are starting to show concerning signs of cognitive decline, contact our office today to learn more about Bredesen protocol therapy. It could be your first step toward reversing mental decline and enjoying life to its fullest.

Latest News in Lincolnia, VA

Fireworks Near Me: Old Town Alexandria July 4th Events 2023

Patch has your guide to Independence Day fireworks shows, parades and other celebrations around Old Town Alexandria.ALEXANDRIA, VA — Alexandria's birthday fireworks will come days after the Fourth of July, but there are other fireworks and festivities to check out during the days before around Old Town Alexandria.We gathered up all the fireworks shows, parades and festivals happening in and around Old Town Alexandria for July 4 and beyond.Here's what's in store this July 4 in and around Old Town Alexandria:...

Patch has your guide to Independence Day fireworks shows, parades and other celebrations around Old Town Alexandria.

ALEXANDRIA, VA — Alexandria's birthday fireworks will come days after the Fourth of July, but there are other fireworks and festivities to check out during the days before around Old Town Alexandria.

We gathered up all the fireworks shows, parades and festivals happening in and around Old Town Alexandria for July 4 and beyond.

Here's what's in store this July 4 in and around Old Town Alexandria:

Alexandria 274th/USA 247th Birthday Celebration and Fireworks

When: Saturday, July 8, 8:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., rain date Sunday, July 9

Find out what's happening in Old Town Alexandriawith free, real-time updates from Patch.

Where: Oronoco Bay Park, 100 Madison St., Alexandria, VA

The Alexandria/USA Birthday Celebration will feature fireworks, live music, food and more. The fireworks display is expected to begin around 9:30 p.m.

The schedule is:

Fireworks will be viewable at Canal Center Plaza (Center Canal Plaza) , Rivergate Park (2 Montgomery St.), Oronoco Bay Park (100 Madison St.), Founders Park (351 North Union St.), Waterfront Park (1A Prince St.), Point Lumley Park, (1 Duke St.), Windmill Hill Park (501 South Union St.), Fords Landing boardwalk (99 Franklin St.), Jones Point Park (Jones Point Drive) and George Washington Masonic Temple (101 Callahan Drive).

An American Celebration at Mount Vernon

When: July 4, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Where: George Washington's Mount Vernon, 3200 Mount Vernon Memorial Hwy., Mount Vernon, VA

On the Fourth of July, enjoy daytime fireworks, observe a naturalization ceremony with people around the world becoming U.S. citizens, watch a performance by the National Concert Band, learn the 18th-century baking process with Resident Baker Justin Cherry of Half Crown Bakehouse, sample fresh bread, see 18th-century magic in the upper garden with Mr. Peter Gardiner and more.

Washington, DC Fourth of July Celebration

When: July 4

Where: Around National Mall, Washington, DC

There will be various events for Fourth of July in DC, including the National Independence Day Parade from 11:45 a.m. to 2 p.m. along Constitution Avenue NW from 7th Street NW to 17th Street NW with marching bands, fife and drum corps, floats, military units, giant balloons, equestrian, drill teams and more. A Capitol Fourth Concert is a free event held on the West Lawn of the United States Capitol at 8 p.m. and will be livestreamed. Fireworks will be held starting at 9:09 p.m., launched from both sides of the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool.

4th of July Celebration & Fireworks at the Military Women's Memorial

When: July 4, 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Where: Military Women's Memorial, Memorial Ave and Schley Dr., Arlington, VA

The Military Women's Memorial will host families for views of DC's fireworks. Attendees will enjoy a catered buffet, open bars, live music, family-friendly movies and popcorn, activities for all ages, photo booth, games and glowsticks.

City of Fairfax Independence Day Parade

When: Tuesday, July 4 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Where: Downtown Fairfax, VA

The Independence Day Parade has been a tradition since 1967 and is the largest in Virginia. Parade participants include marching bands, floats, Shriners' little cars and big motorcycles, old fire engines, clowns and more. The parade is typically followed by an Old-Fashioned Fireman's Day with children's fire safety activities. Parade food vendors will also be on site.

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More from Old Town Alexandria

Longtime Mason District Supervisor Penny Gross will retire, opting out of next election

Longtime Mason District Supervisor Penny Gross will not run for reelection next year.The 27-year Board of Supervisors veteran announced this morning that she will officially retire when her term is up on Dec. 31, 2023, meaning Gross will remain in office for another full year.“This was a difficult decision, but it’s the right time,” Gross said. “…There’s still a year left. I will be here and continuing to do the same things I’ve been doing the last 27 years, but it is time.”...

Longtime Mason District Supervisor Penny Gross will not run for reelection next year.

The 27-year Board of Supervisors veteran announced this morning that she will officially retire when her term is up on Dec. 31, 2023, meaning Gross will remain in office for another full year.

“This was a difficult decision, but it’s the right time,” Gross said. “…There’s still a year left. I will be here and continuing to do the same things I’ve been doing the last 27 years, but it is time.”

Gross told FFXnow last week that she would announce her plans for the 2023 elections one way or another this month.

First elected in 1995 to represent the Mason District, which encompasses Annandale, Seven Corners, Bailey’s Crossroads, and Lincolnia down to I-95 in Springfield, Gross won her seventh and final term in 2019 with nearly 64% of the vote.

She’s been a long-time advocate of expanding public transportation, affordable housing, and diversity in the county.

Even back in 1999, when she was running for her first reelection bid, she defended the increasing diversity and changing demographics in Fairfax County.

“I am troubled by the amount of animosity by some in the community about ‘those people,'” Gross told The Washington Post 23 years ago. “One of the things I hear at civic association meetings is a concern that folks who are moving in don’t have the same appreciation as those who are moving out. I’m not sure that’s the case.”

Gross has also served as the vice chairman of the board since 2009.

Early in her career, she worked on the staff of Idaho Sen. Frank Church, who very nearly won the Democratic presidential nomination in 1976.

Board Chair Jeff McKay praised Gross for being a “leader” and leaving a lasting legacy.

I know that you’ve thought about this long and hard. You’ve been an outstanding and continue to be an outstanding vice chair to me as chairman and leader for the county, and as I said, there will be a lot of time for us to reflect on this in the months ahead, but I think the simplest thing to do today is just to share with you how grateful I am for everything you’ve done for the county and for the residents of Mason District and how proud I am of the legacy that you’ve built for others and the leadership attributes that you brought to the table in an always reasonable, well-organized, respectful, well-thought-out way, and so, very, very grateful for that.

Gross got a bit emotional when announcing her decision to retire, particularly after McKay’s comments.

“I practiced this in front of a mirror, and I wasn’t going to cry. I wasn’t going to get emotional. At some point, you get emotional,” she said.

Gross isn’t the only long-time supervisor to announce they won’t be seeking re-election in 2023. This past summer, Dranesville District Supervisor John Foust said he would be stepping down at the end of his term as well.

Gross’s full announcement of her retirement is below.

When I first moved to the National Capital Region, The Byrds had a hit recording that emulated Ecclesiastes – To Everything There Is a Season (popularly known as Turn Turn Turn). To a young Hill staffer, the song was more a peace anthem than a life plan but, over time, I have come to learn, and accept that, indeed, there is a season and a “time for every purpose under heaven.” Some of the times noted in the song are especially appropriate for those who are privileged to be elected officials — a time to plant and a time to reap, a time to build up, a time to speak, and, sometimes, a time to keep silent.

In our positions as elected officials, we have additional seasons that require our attention and participation — snow season, budget season, campaign season, for example. Mindful that the campaign season is nearly upon us, I am announcing today that I will not seek reelection in 2023 and I’ll retire when this term is completed on December 31, 2023. There is lots more to do, but there will always be lots more to do. I love my job. I appreciate and respect my colleagues and treasure all of Mason District and the residents who have placed their trust and confidence in me for the past 27 years. During the next year plus, my staff and I will endeavor to provide the same robust constituent services as we have done for nearly three decades. We’re so fortunate to be in Fairfax County, an outstanding place to live, work, play, worship and learn. I’m proud and grateful to have played a role in ensuring these opportunities for our diverse community, and I look forward to the continuing success of Fairfax County and the region.

Angela Woolsey contributed to this report.

A quiet, rural Lincolnia is remembered by a long-time resident

Few Lincolnia residents know what their community was like when it was still a rural enclave, before it became choked with strip malls, subdivisions, and traffic.Third-generation Lincolnia resident Jill Gerald, 79, remembers. At a presentation on Lincolnia in the Olden Days at the Mason Government Center in August, Gerald spoke about the old farms, country stores, and her family’s roots long before Shirley Highway was built. ...

Few Lincolnia residents know what their community was like when it was still a rural enclave, before it became choked with strip malls, subdivisions, and traffic.

Third-generation Lincolnia resident Jill Gerald, 79, remembers. At a presentation on Lincolnia in the Olden Days at the Mason Government Center in August, Gerald spoke about the old farms, country stores, and her family’s roots long before Shirley Highway was built.

Her father was born in Lincolnia in 1885. Her mother moved across the road in 1900 when she was 2 years old.

They went to a one-room schoolhouse near what is now the intersection of Interstate 395 and Route 236. The school only covered five years, and the older kids taught the younger ones.

Gerald and her twin brother were the youngest of nine children – the four oldest ones were born at home.

Her parents bought their house in 1924, and Jill lived on that property for 77 years and now lives nearby.

Gerald’s mother’s cousin worked at a chicken hatchery where Landmark Plaza is now. “The women’s job there was de-beaking the baby chicks so they wouldn’t hurt each other,” she says.

She remembers going to Howard’s Store on Columbia Pike, across from the Discount Zone gas station, where local farmers bought feed and straw. The building had a lunch counter, tables and chairs, gas pumps out front, and the owners’ living quarters in the rear. The store was owned by Jill’s uncle Harry. He had one of the first TVs in the area, and a crowd gathered there to watch boxing and wrestling matches.

Gerald attended Lincolnia Elementary School on N. Chambliss Street. Part of that building was preserved when Lincolnia Senior Center was built on that site.

Each student was given a vitamin at lunch, she recalls. As a clinic aid in the seventh grade, she was responsible for making sure the cot had clean sheets and cleaning up the blood after accidents, such as the time a globe fell on a girl’s head.

Schools and churches had a close relationship back in the day, she says. The church didn’t have running water so it held dinners at the school and church softball teams used the school field.

A little white church on Lincolnia Road near the post office was torn down when Shirley Highway was built in the early 1950s, and Gerald remembers that when the congregation moved to a new building, church members carried everything – the pews, Bible, cross, communion items – as they walked to their new home.

The area between Columbia Pike and Braddock Road was originally settled by former slaves and had stayed a predominantly black community for decades, as “everything was segregated back then,” Gerald notes.

That community had its own school and small white church, which had been expanded over the years and is now the large, brick Mount Pleasant Baptist Church on the corner of Lincolnia Road and Columbia Pike. A historic marker was installed there a year ago.

When Gerald was in school, black students were bused to a segregated high school in Manassas, and later were sent to the all-black Luther Jackson High School, which is now a middle school.

“Segregation ended in 1962 but everybody didn’t comply with it right away,” she says.

Twins Jack and Jill (the future Jill Gerald) feed the family chickens.

Gerald remembers the Dowden family, who lived in an old house on Fairfax Parkway where what is now the Parklawn community. Sarah Foster Dowden attended the one-room school and helped teach the younger children. Later, they built a brick house across from the dam on Columbia Pike. Mr. Dowden was a justice of the peace in Groveton and also gave dogs rabies shots.

The Clark House, which is now owned by the Fairfax County Park Authority and was rotated to its current position overlooking Barcroft Plaza, used to be Clark family’s farmhouse. The Clarks owned a large dairy farm where Parklawn is now.

There was no trash pickup when Gerald was a child. People burned their trash and kids played in the garbage dump in a small area in the future Parklawn community. The rest of that area was a field with cows.

A worker at the chicken farm.

There used to be a chapel and social hall on the site of the cemetery near the senior center, and students from the Episcopal seminary used to walk there to preach. Gerald’s parents, grandparents, husband, and son are buried there.

Several years ago, there was a plan for townhouses on that property, but Fairfax County purchased the land in 2012 for use as a burial ground for indigents.

Lincolnia was originally known as Lebanon, Gerald says. The residents wanted to rename it for President Lincoln, but there already was a town in Virginia called Lincoln, so they settled on Lincolnia.

Gerald went to Fairfax High School for the eighth and ninth grades, then transferred to Annandale High School when it opened in 1955. An older sister graduated from Mount Vernon High School; two others went to Fairfax High School. One of her older brothers worked at the Torpedo Factory in Alexandria when it produced torpedoes for World War II.

Jill Gerald (right) and her daughter Debi Gerald.

Gerald recalls shopping at Landmark Plaza when there was a Grand Union grocery store (where Total Wine is now), an S. Klein department store, Sterling Hardware, and a greeting-card store called Magellan’s.

Landmark Plaza will be evolving again soon, when Giant opens in the space formerly occupied by Shopper’s. The new Giant is expected to open before Thanksgiving. Hobby Lobby is expected to open in the upper level in spring 2019.

More comprehensive changes are coming to Lincolnia. A task force is drafting recommendations for amending the comprehensive plan to allow for more density, more coordinated development, and transportation improvements.

Door To Door: Lincolnia Hills, Va. And Kent, D.C.

Kathy Hoekstra standing in front of her home in the Lincolnia Hills neighborhood of Alexandria Va.John HinesIt’s our weekly trip around the region. This time, we’ll visit Lincolnia Hills in Alexandria, Va., and the Kent neighborhood of Northwest D.C.Lincolnia Hills, Va.Kathy Hoekstra lives in northern Virginia, just west of Interstate 395. And she says that her neighborhood of Lincolnia Hills in Alexandria has remained immune to urbanization, even though it’s still located inside...

Kathy Hoekstra standing in front of her home in the Lincolnia Hills neighborhood of Alexandria Va.

John Hines

It’s our weekly trip around the region. This time, we’ll visit Lincolnia Hills in Alexandria, Va., and the Kent neighborhood of Northwest D.C.

Lincolnia Hills, Va.

Kathy Hoekstra lives in northern Virginia, just west of Interstate 395. And she says that her neighborhood of Lincolnia Hills in Alexandria has remained immune to urbanization, even though it’s still located inside the Beltway. “It’s all basically single family homes, so we have no apartments or commercial buildings.”

Hoekstra says that government employees built up Lincolnia HIlls in the mid-50s. “But obviously, some of those people have passed on, and their homes have been bought by new families coming in,” she says. “So we have Hispanics and African Americans and a whole group of everybody else across the spectrum. So federal workers, white collar workers, blue collar workers, it’s a very mixed group, which is wonderful.”

According to Hoekstra, Lincolnia Hills has a mixed group of wildlife as well. “We also have a stream that flows down in this area. We have deer and raccoon and foxes, and a lot of wildlife, which I don’t think too many people expect within the Beltway, but we have a lot of them.”

Hoekstra believes that Lincolnia Hills is a unique neighborhood in the Washington area. “It’s a wonderful neighborhood, and it’s a very peaceful, quiet neighborhood inside the Beltway, which I think is somewhat unusual.”

Kent, D.C.

Connie Carter lives in the Kent neighborhood of northwest D.C., a community located near the Potomac River.

While Kent primarily saw development in the 1930s, Carter says the neighborhood today is an eclectic one. “The architecture itself is a mishmash, and so I think it attracts a variety of people,” she says. “The key elementary school is located in Kent on Dana Place down near MacArthur, so there are a large number of families and small children as well.”

According to Carter, Kent isn’t just eclectic. It’s historical. “Chain Bridge Road is not only the oldest or second oldest street in Washington, D.C., but is by far the oldest street in Kent,” she says.

Chain Bridge Road allowed trucks to go down to the canal and cut through the woods. “I believe there was a railroad or a streetcar at the bottom of the hill, so it was a pretty significant bypass road.”

Carter says that Kent’s location is a major perk. “You can live in northwest Washington and still be in Bethesda, out at Tyson’s Corner and at Reagan Airport and Georgetown all within 15 or 10 minutes. So it’s highly convenient.”

[Music: “No, Girl” by John Davis from Title Tracks]

Explore previously featured neighborhoods on our Door to Door map:

This map shows previous Door to Door segments, and includes links to photos and show audio. The yellow marker represents neighborhoods featured in Washington, D.C., the blue represents neighborhoods in Maryland, and the red represents neighborhoods in Virginia.

Investigation finds 'systemic gaps' in FCPS hiring after counselor convicted of sex crimes allowed to continue working

Darren Thornton worked as a middle school counselor in Fairfax County despite a conviction for sex crimes against children.LINCOLNIA, Va. — Tuesday, former Fairfax County Public Schools counselor Darren Thornton was in a Chesterfield County, Virginia courtroom on charges of soliciting prostitution, the allegations that ...

Darren Thornton worked as a middle school counselor in Fairfax County despite a conviction for sex crimes against children.

LINCOLNIA, Va. — Tuesday, former Fairfax County Public Schools counselor Darren Thornton was in a Chesterfield County, Virginia courtroom on charges of soliciting prostitution, the allegations that got him fired this past summer from his job at Glasgow Middle School.

By law he should have been fired nearly two years ago when he was first charged and eventually convicted of sex crimes against children.

For that, Thornton was placed on probation. He had already passed a background check to get hired with Fairfax County Public Schools and kept working despite his conviction.

"We need to understand what happened here and why it happened," said Kathleen Brown, a FCPS parent at a Tuesday night meeting at Glasgow Middle.

At the meeting, the FCPS superintendent Dr. Michelle Reid shared with parents the results of an independent investigation into Thornton's employment.

The report found the district was never notified of Thornton's original arrest or conviction.

And also found "several systemic gaps" in the FCPS hiring process "including on reference checks, verification of the appropriate license, and information sharing between jurisdictions" among other issues the superintendent says FCPS is addressing as quickly as possible.

"One of the things that we have to do first is name that we have a concern, acknowledge that, look into it, and then follow recommendations that we know to be best practice moving forward," Dr. Reid told WUSA9. "I don't believe it's going to happen again here in Fairfax County Public Schools. And, I believe our families can trust us."

"I really think Dr. Reid is on the right path here. But I think we have to persist," said Brown echoing the concerns of some other parents at the meeting.

"To blithely say, 'No, this is not happening, it's not going to happen again here,' is very naïve," said Brown. "We have got to realize we've got all sorts of concerns about our kids and I think they're valid concerns."

One change Dr. Reid said she wants is regular background checks of current staff, after they are hired. But, she says she needs the commonwealth's help to make that feasible by enrolling in a FBI program called Rap Back.

The superintendent also says she has already taken disciplinary action on school employees and more could be coming but she won't say who or what it was.

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