Reclaim Your Cognitive Function

With Help from Proactive Wellness Centers

Book Appointment

Office: 8229 Boone Blvd. Suite 280 Newington, VA 22182 Hours Open Monday through Friday 9AM to 5PM

Help Reverse Cognitive Decline with

Bredesen Protocol Alzheimers Treatment in Newington, VA

There's no way around it: Getting diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease can be both scary and disheartening for patients and their loved ones. The cognitive impairment, memory loss, and eventual cognitive decline can seem like a grim prognosis. Unfortunately, the standard reductionist approach seeking to identify a single silver bullet cure doesn't account for the multifactorial nature of Alzheimer's disease.

That's why treating Alzheimer's disease requires a multifaceted response from functional medicine. While there is no single drug that can cure Alzheimer's, protocols addressing the nuanced factors contributing to the disease can make a difference. That's where Proactive Wellness Centers and Bredesen protocol treatment in Newington, VA comes into play.

Service Areas

Bredesen Protocol Alzheimers Treatment Newington, VA

The Proactive Wellness Approach to Brain Health

At Proactive Wellness, we firmly believe that brain health is an essential part of your overall well-being. However, despite the emergence of new research, there has been limited understanding of how to promote brain health effectively. This includes reducing the risk of dementia/Alzheimer's and stabilizing cognitive decline in patients with early symptoms. Dr. Lawson, an esteemed Bredesen Protocol practitioner and ReCode 2.0 Certified with 17 years of experience in functional medicine can identify and address the root cause of cognitive decline in you or your loved one.

Dr. Lawson's goal isn't to replace the role of family physicians. Rather, we collaborate with primary care physicians, internists, and other medical professionals to provide a comprehensive approach to care. We believe that every individual is unique from a physiological perspective, and therefore, we avoid a one-size-fits-all approach. Instead, our programs focus on a customized approach, addressing risk factors that, if avoided or modified, could have beneficial effects for men and women who have dementia.

Our programs have a strong emphasis on slowing down and reversing the aging process, preventing diseases, and treating chronically ill patients. To achieve this, we employ a three-pronged approach:

  • We empower patients with the knowledge they need to manage their health and attain optimal well-being.
  • We prioritize disease prevention by conducting a thorough evaluation with the help of comprehensive diagnostics and the patient's health history form.
  • We collaborate with patients to implement a rejuvenation program that includes various science-based treatments, like our Brain Health Optimization Program (BHOP) for people suffering from dementia and Alzheimer's

One of the most popular and effective programs we offer includes Bredesen protocol treatment in Newington VA. This revolutionary approach to dementia has provided hope and improved cognitive function for countless people in the US. But to understand the importance of the Bredesen protocol, it's important that you first understand dementia, Alzheimer's, and its effect on people across the world.

The Wide-Reaching Effects of

Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia

There are currently more than 5.8 million individuals in the United States who are living with Alzheimer's disease. It is predicted that the number of individuals with Alzheimer's disease will more than double by 2050.

Dementia is a type of cognitive decline that affects mental abilities. There are many different causes and complex layers involved. Cognitive impairment is characterized by abnormal results on tests measuring memory, speech, critical thinking, and other cognitive abilities, but individuals with this diagnosis are still capable of performing daily activities such as bathing, dressing, and eating. Without proper treatment, Alzheimer's disease is likely to follow within a few years. Alzheimer's disease is the most prevalent form of dementia, and it is diagnosed through neuro-imaging and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid.

In the past, being diagnosed with Alzheimer's was often worse than receiving a death sentence. It was dehumanizing and stripped individuals of their memories, thinking abilities, and independence. However, after three decades of research, we now have a greater understanding of this devastating illness and even solutions like Bredesen protocol treatment in Newington, VA that can help patients deal with dementia.

Bredesen Protocol Alzheimers Treatment Newington, VA

What Causes Dementia?

Dementia is caused by a normal and healthy brain process that malfunctions due to a toxic environment, inflammation, and a lack of necessary nutrients and hormones. The brain's defense mechanism produces amyloid plaques, which serve as a protective helmet around the brain. Unfortunately, these plaques destroy connections between nerve cells, ultimately affecting comprehension, recollection, and clarity.

Bredesen Protocol Alzheimers Treatment Newington, VA

Dementia by the Numbers

It's important to understand the impact of Alzheimer's disease (AD) around the world. According to the CDC, AD is present in 50% of patients in nursing homes and causes more than 110,000 deaths annually in the US. It was the 6th leading cause of death in 2015. More than 5 million people in the US are affected by AD, and recent data indicates that the problem is getting worse.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 47 million people around the world are currently living with dementia, and this number is expected to rise to 75 million by 2030 and 132 million by 2050. Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, accounting for 60 to 80 percent of all cases.

While reading those statistics can be disheartening, there's reason to be hopeful. New therapies and treatments offered at Proactive Wellness - like Bredesen protocol treatment - can help patients deal with dementia and cognitive decline.

Bredesen Protocol Alzheimers Treatment Newington, VA

The Power of

Bredesen Protocol Treatment in Newington, VA

The Bredesen Protocol is a highly personalized treatment program that aims to reverse cognitive decline and improve brain function in patients. Dr. Bredesen has designed the protocol to be adaptable and customizable, tailored to the specific symptoms and needs of each patient.

The program is centered around lifestyle changes, medication, and nutritional adjustments, all of which are tailored to address the unique symptoms and environmental factors that may be contributing to cognitive decline. This approach, referred to as ReCODE, helps patients to combat brain fog and prevent the onset of dementia.

It has also helped patients improve cognitive function significantly, reverse symptoms, and even return to work. The ReCODE program comprises lifestyle interventions, therapeutic diets, and targeted nutrients. Proactive Wellness Centers is thrilled to offer this promising treatment modality for Alzheimer's disease to benefit our patients.

It all starts with a baseline Bredesen evaluation at our wellness clinic in Newington, VA.

Baseline Bredesen Evaluation from

Proactive Wellness Centers

At Proactive Wellness Centers, we have two ways to help patients who are in search of Bredesen protocol treatment in Newington, VA. The first option is our Baseline Bredesen Evaluation, which is best suited for asymptomatic patients - that is, individuals who do not exhibit any significant cognitive decline beyond what is expected with age. Dr. Bredesen classifies such patients as "PreCode."

This evaluation serves as a starting point for PreCode patients, as well as those who are unsure of their cognitive status and potential risk factors. Our baseline evaluation includes the following:

The first step involves conducting a comprehensive set of baseline labs to evaluate your overall health, closely following the Bredesen protocol. This step goes beyond standard labs that you might have for a physical. It includes tests for magnesium, zinc, and selenium levels, B6, B12, and folate levels, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid levels.

It also includes

  • Pre-Diabetes Evaluation
  • Hormone Level Evaluation
  • Thyroid Level Evaluation
  • Specific Immune Marker Evaluation such as TH1, TH2, IL6, and TNF.

Our goal with this assessment is to establish a starting point and compare your cognitive function against what is typical for your age group. We have chosen to use the CNS Vital Signs cognitive assessment, which is widely recognized as one of the best in the industry. Additionally, we will be conducting the standard MoCA test as part of the evaluation.

A DNA test is performed to identify the specific APOE genotype present in your DNA. APOE e4 has been shown to be associated with an increased chance of late-onset Alzheimer's disease, which occurs after a person is 65 years old.

This step covers your lab results and includes a detailed plan of action to address areas of improvement as identified in your baseline evaluation.

Bredesen Protocol Alzheimers Treatment Newington, VA

What are the Early Signs of

Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease?

As we grow older, it can be difficult to distinguish between normal changes in our cognitive abilities and the initial signs of dementia. The issue with preventing chronic illnesses is that we often believe we are healthy as long as we don't experience any symptoms, but this is not entirely accurate. Symptoms are typically the last indicator of a disease, meaning it has already progressed by the time they appear.

While it's always best to catch diseases before you notice symptoms, taking proactive measures at the first sign of cognitive changes can greatly impact the aging of your brain and body. It's crucial to act immediately if you're experiencing the following symptoms of Mild Cognitive Impairment. That way, ,you have a better chance of preventing the development of Alzheimer's.

Bredesen Protocol Alzheimers Treatment Newington, VA

Roughly 10% of individuals with MCI progress to Alzheimer's annually.

Fortunately, Bredesen protocol treatment in Newington, VA may provide you with a chance to delay or even reverse these symptoms

Memory Issues

Memory Issues

You have a hard time remembering events that happened recently, such as appointments or important conversations with loved ones. You may also have trouble remembering important information.

Language Issues

Language Issues

You have trouble finding relevant words when you're talking with other people. You may also have problems following along with complex or complicated discussions.

Maintaining Concentration

Difficulty Maintaining Concentration and Attention

You have noticed a reduced ability to focus and stay honed in on most tasks. You may also not be able to multitask effectively, and it may be harder to keep your attention for long periods of time.

Decline in Executive Functions

Decline in Executive Functions

This symptom involves difficulty with skills like decision-making, planning, problem-solving, and organizing. These difficulties are often most apparent in day-to-day activities.

Visuospatial Awareness

Problems with Visuospatial Awareness

You may have trouble parking your car, judging distances, reading maps, or completing tasks that necessitate spatial orientation.

Impaired Judgement

Impaired Judgement and Reasoning

This may include problems when making judgments or decisions. Examples may consist of difficulties making financial decisions, managing finances, making reasonable and appropriate social decisions, or thinking through risky situations.

Bredesen Protocol Alzheimers Treatment Newington, VA

By contrast, some of the most common signs of normal aging can include the following

Experiencing temporary lapses in memory, where recently learned details like names or scheduled events may slip from one's mind but can be remembered later on

  • You occasionally make mistakes, but nothing that stands out as significant or unusual.
  • You have to ask for help putting together or setting up electronic devices or equipment.
  • You sometimes forget what day it is but have the ability to remember the correct date later on.
  • Your vision is getting worse, which is caused by cataracts.
  • You experience shortness of breath or get tired more often when being active.
  • You feel unusual aches and pains, especially during poor weather.
  • You get confused sometimes but don't have an inability to make decisions or multitask.
  • You have a hard time keeping your body temp regulated.
  • You get angry or frustrated when tasks aren't completed in certain ways.

Your Trusted Choice for Bredesen Protocol Treatment in Newington, VA

Maintaining a healthy brain is crucial for one's overall well-being, yet there remains a lack of knowledge when it comes to promoting brain health, reducing the likelihood of dementia, or managing symptoms for those exhibiting early warning signs.

That's why we're excited to offer patients the ReCODE program at Proactive Wellness Centers. Developed by Doctor Bredesen, this treatment has shown remarkable success in improving cognitive function and even reversing symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. This comprehensive program includes lifestyle changes, dietary interventions, and specialized nutrients, and we are eager to provide this promising treatment option to patients like you.

If you or a loved one are starting to show concerning signs of cognitive decline, contact our office today to learn more about Bredesen protocol therapy. It could be your first step toward reversing mental decline and enjoying life to its fullest.

Latest News in Newington, VA

Costco Buys Office Building In Newington From Bethesda-Based Finmarc

SPRINGFIELD, VA — Costco Wholesale has acquired a two-story office building next to one of its retail stores in Newington from Finmarc Management Inc., a commercial real estate investment firm based in Bethesda, for $6.55 million, Finmarc said Tuesday.The 27,000-square-foot building, at 7375 Boston Boulevard in Newington, is located next to the Costco Wholesale retail store at 7373 Boston Boulevard.Finmarc bought the two-story building in June 2022 as p...

SPRINGFIELD, VA — Costco Wholesale has acquired a two-story office building next to one of its retail stores in Newington from Finmarc Management Inc., a commercial real estate investment firm based in Bethesda, for $6.55 million, Finmarc said Tuesday.

The 27,000-square-foot building, at 7375 Boston Boulevard in Newington, is located next to the Costco Wholesale retail store at 7373 Boston Boulevard.

Finmarc bought the two-story building in June 2022 as part of an 11-building acquisition consisting of about 740,000 square feet of office, industrial and data center space on Boston Boulevard. Finmarc paid Boston Properties Inc. $127.5 for the buildings, known as the VA 95 portfolio.

The two-story building, located on a 2.81-acre site, was vacant at the time of the sale to Costco, Finmarc said.

"Part of our decision when acquiring the VA 95 portfolio last summer was our belief of the strong opportunity to strategically sell certain buildings parcels for higher and better uses," Finmarc Co-Founder and Principal David Fink said in a statement Tuesday. "The building parcel situated adjacent to the existing Costco perfectly matched that profile and represents our first opportunity to execute this thesis."

"The ability for Costco to expand its footprint makes perfect business sense in their continuing mission to find better and more efficient ways to provide best-in-class services to its members," Fink said.

Costco did not disclose its plans for the building or parcel at the closing of the deal, Finmarc said.

The building on Boston Boulevard is less than two miles from a site on Loisdale Road in Springfield under consideration by the General Services Administration for the new FBI headquarters.

"Generally speaking, the government's presence in the area is a great benefit to the buildings we own," Finmarc said in a statement emailed to Patch. "The portfolio sits adjacent to NASA and Department of State and Customs Borders lease properties on Boston Boulevard. An FBI headquarters would enhance our ability to lease in the future."

Finmarc’s VA 95 portfolio consists of single-story and two-story buildings ranging from 27,000 to 105,000 square feet of space, and are situated close to Fort Belvoir, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency and Marine Corps Base Quantico.

The government presence in the area has helped produce record low vacancies for industrial real estate in the area, the company noted. No new buildings are currently under construction in the area, and no new commercial office buildings have been built in the Newington and Springfield market over the past six years, according to Finmarc.

"We believe well-located and best-in-class flex/office and industrial buildings situated in the outer ring suburbs will continue to flourish, and we remain extremely confident in the long-term economic fundamentals of the Springfield and Northern Virginia submarket," the company said.

Regional food bank seeks to double capacity with expanded Newington warehouse

(Updated at 10:25 a.m. on 5/24/2023) Construction has begun on a new warehouse for the Capital Area Food Bank (CAFB) in the Newington area.The organization, which supports nonprofits and provides meals to residents throughout the D.C. region, broke ground on the 43,00...

(Updated at 10:25 a.m. on 5/24/2023) Construction has begun on a new warehouse for the Capital Area Food Bank (CAFB) in the Newington area.

The organization, which supports nonprofits and provides meals to residents throughout the D.C. region, broke ground on the 43,000-square-foot distribution facility at ​​6833 Hill Park Drive, Lorton, on May 15.

Expected to more than double CAFB’s capacity in Northern Virginia, the new warehouse replaces a smaller building on the same site that the food bank says “no longer had the size or efficiencies required to address the area’s rising need.”

“Building an expanded facility in Northern Virginia couldn’t come at a more important time: in the wake of the pandemic and sustained rates of inflation, there are still so many in our community who are struggling to make ends meet and to access enough nutritious food,” CAFB President and CEO Radha Muthiah said. “This building is an investment in the future of thousands of Northern Virginians, both today and in the years to come.”

About 24% of Fairfax County residents reported experiencing food insecurity in 2021, putting it on the lower end of a spectrum that ranged from 21% in Arlington County to 48% in Prince George’s County, according to CAFB’s 2022 Hunger Report.

Expected to be released this September, the next hunger report could tell an even more sobering story after a year of inflation and diminishing public assistance. As of February, food prices were 10% higher than that time last year, CAFB said in its annual report, and the end of emergency SNAP benefits placed new pressure on local food banks.

(Correction: This article previously said the next hunger report is expected this summer. While last year’s report came out in June, CAFB says this year’s will likely be published in September, coinciding with Hunger Action Month.)

Capital Area Food Bank distributed nearly three times as many meals in the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic as in the preceding year, Fairfax County leaders said last year. In February 2022, the county’s Board of Supervisors approved a $5 million contribution from its federal Covid relief funds to support to the food bank’s warehouse expansion.

CAFB projects that the project will cost a total of $35 million, which it hopes to cover with both public and private funding. So far, seven localities and Virginia have invested over $9 million, and Sens. Mark Warner and Tim Kaine and Rep. Gerry Connolly, have requested federal Community Project Funding.

“The new 43,000 square-foot facility will be nearly 3.5 times larger than the existing building, allowing the food bank to store and distribute more produce, provide more space for its partner nonprofits to pick up food, and offer volunteering opportunities at its Virginia warehouse for the first time,” CAFB said in a press release.

In addition to hosting a new volunteer center, the warehouse will be larger and more flexible with updated equipment compared to the previous building, which was built in 1982.

The old warehouse’s cooler and storage space had become inadequate, and maintenance was “cost-prohibitive,” CAFB said.

The new building is expected to be completed by late summer 2024.

CAFB isn’t the only local food assistance nonprofit to seek a capacity boost recently. Food for Others opened an addition to its Merrifield warehouse in February that allows clients to shop for groceries.

CAFB distributes more than 50 million meals across the D.C. region annually, according to its website. The organization’s main distribution facility is in northeast D.C.

Fallen power lines cause massive backup on I-95 at Fairfax County Parkway; strands drivers for hours

Interstate 95 in Newington, Virginia, experienced a major disruption today when a power line fell across the highway, leading to its closure for several hours. The incident, which caused significant inconvenience for motorists, is currently under investigation to determine the cause.According to Dominion Energy, the power line may have been struck by landscaping equipment, resulting in its snap. The Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) is also looking into the possibility of their own crew's involvement. Immediate danger was p...

Interstate 95 in Newington, Virginia, experienced a major disruption today when a power line fell across the highway, leading to its closure for several hours. The incident, which caused significant inconvenience for motorists, is currently under investigation to determine the cause.

According to Dominion Energy, the power line may have been struck by landscaping equipment, resulting in its snap. The Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) is also looking into the possibility of their own crew's involvement. Immediate danger was present on the scene, as a nearby gas station reported a fire, necessitating the activation of emergency shut-off measures. Scorch marks on the ground bear witness to the intensity of the incident.

Commuters voiced their frustration at the situation, describing it as another instance of the perennial traffic woes they endure. Eyewitnesses shared photos that captured the aftermath of the fallen power line, with one image showing a shattered windshield, suggesting that a driver may have been struck. Loreto Cruz, a producer at FOX 5, happened to be on the road during the incident and shared firsthand accounts and pictures.

Efforts to restore normalcy involved Dominion Power crews working diligently to de-energize the line, remove it, and reopen the affected stretch of Interstate 95. Throughout the process, crews closely examined the telephone pole in question in an attempt to shed light on the precise cause of the incident. A Dominion Energy spokesperson says it appears some landscaping equipment may have hit the post causing it to snap.

The closure of the interstate led to diverted traffic and subsequent congestion on nearby side roads. Compounding the issue, some traffic lights in the area were also out of operation, exacerbating the already challenging situation for drivers.

Motorists shared their disbelief at the unprecedented turn of events, with some forced to turn around on the interstate to find alternative routes. The magnitude of the disruption was especially striking for individuals unaccustomed to such traffic conditions, like Becky Zingler, who remarked on the extraordinary experience of traveling against the flow on the interstate.

Reflecting on the incident, Clint Van Winkle expressed his astonishment at the swift actions taken to redirect traffic once the need to change direction became apparent.

While power has been largely restored, plans for re-stringing the lines across the interstate are still being finalized. The investigation into the cause of the incident remains ongoing by VDOT, with authorities determined to uncover the exact circumstances that led to the power line's fall

Relocating Northampton VA hospital would make it nearly impossible for many impaired vets to receive essential medical care, advocates say

For veterans across Western Massachusetts, the possible closure of the Veterans Affairs medical center in Northampton would cause hardship and create for some an almost insurmountable barrier to receiving basic, veteran-specific medical care.But for the mostly older, mostly medically-fragile veterans who have found stable housing near the hospital after struggling through addiction, physical disabilities and homelessness, the prospect of backyard medical care moving to Springfield or Connecticut — as recommended by federal offic...

For veterans across Western Massachusetts, the possible closure of the Veterans Affairs medical center in Northampton would cause hardship and create for some an almost insurmountable barrier to receiving basic, veteran-specific medical care.

But for the mostly older, mostly medically-fragile veterans who have found stable housing near the hospital after struggling through addiction, physical disabilities and homelessness, the prospect of backyard medical care moving to Springfield or Connecticut — as recommended by federal officials — presents an overwhelming obstacle, according to those who work closely with the former service members.

In a report detailed by MassLive last week and published Monday, the Department of Veterans Affairs recommended shuttering the VA Central Western Massachusetts Healthcare System in Northampton, one of just three medical centers it slotted for closure across the country. More than 24,000 veterans rely on the facility in the Leeds village of Northampton for medical care.

In the same building complex as the Northampton hospital is a residential community run by Soldier On, a nonprofit providing housing and support services to homeless veterans. For the 120 men and women living there, the proximity of their apartments to the VA is essential to receiving the care and liveable environment they need.

“These guys know that hospital is right there,” said Steven Connor, director of Central Hampshire Veterans’ Services. “All they have to do is walk down past Building 12, past the Rec Hall, and the next thing they know they’re in the medical facility.”

If needed, there are caseworkers minutes away at the hospital. Across North Main Street is the lush sanctuary of Look Memorial Park. For a veteran seeking a stable shelter, convenient medical care, and a calming setting, there are few better spots than Soldier On’s homes.

The organization — which also provides residences in Massachusetts in Agawam, Pittsfield and Chicopee — has 44 permanent housing units in Northampton filled with veterans who have faced homelessness in the past. It has an additional 76 transitional units, 16 of which are women-only, to assist veterans as they search for more stable housing. On any given night, 120 men and women who may otherwise be in a homeless shelter or without a roof over their heads sleep in the Soldier On buildings and rely on the hospital campus for its services, said Bruce Buckley, the nonprofit’s chief executive.

The VA facility, which opened in the early 1920s to care for veterans of World War I, is criticized as outdated. Federal officials recommended on Monday relocating nursing home care and rehabilitation programs to the VA hospital in Newington, Connecticut, while transferring outpatient and mental health services to a VA clinic in Springfield and community providers. The proposal is part of a nationwide modernization of the VA network, officials said.

But the closure of the VA hospital in Northampton — fully known as the Edward P. Boland VA Medical Center — is far from guaranteed. An independent, bipartisan commission will make its recommendations for the facility to President Joe Biden early next year. Federal officials, including Reps. Richard Neal and James McGovern, have pledged to fight to keep the hospital in Northampton.

If the VA closes, Soldier On’s residential community will not. The organization has decades remaining on its lease and no plans to leave the veterans without housing.

But the nonprofit chose the location because of its proximity to the services offered at the VA. If the hospital leaves, instead of walking a few minutes to a medical appointment, residents of Soldier On would be forced to shuttle to a doctor’s office in Springfield or Newington if they want veteran-specific care. Mental health and drug and alcohol treatment centers, now just a baseball’s throw away, would disappear from Northampton, Buckley said.

The VA recommended that community care providers absorb some of the services previously offered at the Northampton hospital, thus allowing veterans to still receive treatment near their homes.

But the U.S. Government Accountability Office said the VA lacked “a full understanding” of community care providers’ ability to supplement VA care, according to a report by the government watchdog released last week.

Former service members often prefer the care of the veteran-specific hospital, Connor said. The staff there are trained to understand the unique struggles war veterans face. Community doctor’s offices and urgent care facilities are not always trained to work with them, he said.

Many of the veterans living in permanent Soldier On housing are over age 55 and have been left with the physical and mental scars of war. They come from the streets and from the woods, from jails and from shelters.

“They’re vulnerable and to leave them up there alone for the next 40 years and in the unknown of what might go on on that campus ... We don’t want to see that campus close,” Buckley said. His organization built more than 40 permanent houses for veterans and dozens of temporary units on the VA campus because if the residents face a personal crisis, the hospital, its clinicians, caseworkers, therapists and security staff are there to assist.

“They’ll be somewhat in the middle of nowhere if the rest of the campus leaves,” Buckley said.

Should the hospital depart, and its services move to Springfield or Newington — a town on the far side of Hartford — the residents of Soldier On’s homes would ideally still have the extensive transportation support the organization offers: a fleet of more than a dozen vans to ferry them to appointments. But that is with the current service offered today, Buckley said. “Who knows what it looks like in 30 years? There is no guarantee that could last forever.”

In that case, the likely only option for a person needing a ride to an appointment would be the public bus.

In the past, veterans have struggled with multi-hour trips to reach treatment at the Holyoke Soldiers’ Home, Connor said. What is normally a 20-minute ride by car can become a 90-minute trip on the PVTA. If medical services were sent to Springfield, the ride for the many veterans who do not drive could take two hours each way.

“That would be their day’s adventure,” Connor said. “Going to an appointment is going to take a whole day.”

Getting to Newington would prove nearly impossible without the help of a friend, family member or ride service. Physically-impaired veterans would need to walk a quarter-mile downhill to catch a PVTA bus to the center of Northampton — about a 20-minute ride. Another walk down the street would find them a Greyhound bus bound for New York, which 90 minutes later would arrive at Hartford’s Union Station. Then it’s another 15-minute bus ride and mile walk to the Newington Veterans Affairs Medical Center. All told, the trip would take three hours one-way.

Driving that far, to access medical care previously a walkable distance away, would take about an hour. But only about a half-dozen of the permanent residents of Soldier On own cars. Many do not have family support networks to shepherd them to the doctor’s office.

The residents of Soldier On have scaled tremendous personal cliffs to reach the point they are at now. They have battled back the physical and mental trauma of war, and many have been gripped by addiction that often can follow. In Soldier On, they have found stability and community with world-class medical care within eyesight. To lose that would be detrimental, Buckley said.

“It’s like you build an apartment in a little town and then the town disappears on you,” he said. “You’re just left with nothing around you.”

But those residents are not the only former service members who would have difficulty accessing services if they moved further away. Spread across the Pioneer Valley are veterans who have come to rely on the Northampton VA hospital and who have chosen to live nearby it.

Connor said many of the veterans in rural communities are reluctant to drive to the “big city” of Northampton for care. They are not going to want to drive to Newington, Boston or even to Springfield, he said.

When Connor needed treatment for a back injury several years ago, the nearest available VA chiropractor was in Newington. He went to only a few appointments before the trips became counterproductive. The doctor would help his pain, but by the time he drove an hour back north his back would again be in a knot.

State Sen. John Velis, of the 2nd Hampden and Hampshrie District, said he had heard similar concerns.

“I see it every day. The people who write these reports don’t take into account travel time,” Velis said. “For people in Western Mass., it’s not as simple as hopping on the goddamn T.”

Related Content:

If you purchase a product or register for an account through a link on our site, we may receive compensation. By using this site, you consent to our User Agreement and agree that your clicks, interactions, and personal information may be collected, recorded, and/or stored by us and social media and other third-party partners in accordance with our Privacy Policy.

County allocates $5M of Covid funds to Capital Area Food Bank expansion

(Updated at 3:40 p.m.) The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors voted last week to allocate $5 million of coronavirus recovery funding to the Capital Area Food Bank to expand its Newington warehouse due to increased need.The project to build a 45,000-square-foot facility is expected to cost $35 million and take two years to complete. CAFB also sought funding from other private partners and the Northern Virginia...

(Updated at 3:40 p.m.) The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors voted last week to allocate $5 million of coronavirus recovery funding to the Capital Area Food Bank to expand its Newington warehouse due to increased need.

The project to build a 45,000-square-foot facility is expected to cost $35 million and take two years to complete. CAFB also sought funding from other private partners and the Northern Virginia local governments and communities they serve. Fairfax County is the first to make a formal announcement of funding, CAFB spokeswoman Hilary Salmon told FFXnow.

“We’re happy not only to invest in them but to keep them in Fairfax County as they had looked at relocating to other places,” Board of Supervisors Chairman Jeffrey McKay said at the board’s meeting.

Located at ​​6833 Hill Park Drive, Lorton, CAFB distributed 27 million meals throughout Northern Virginia during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, McKay said. That was nearly triple the amount of the previous year. CAFB also serves Alexandria City, Arlington, and Prince William counties, as well as Fairfax City, Manassas, Manassas Park and Falls Church.

To keep up with the demand, the food bank had to double warehouse capacity through short-term leases.

The CAFB doesn’t anticipate demand will subside, and expects to distribute 8 million meals in Fairfax County this year. The expansion would increase square footage by nearly 400%, McKay said.

Thank you to Fairfax County for this incredible financial support, which will help us to expand the infrastructure needed to serve Northern Virginia.

CAFB expects to distribute 8 million meals this year in Fairfax County alone, and this support will help us meet that need. https://t.co/R9IMAJmWCf

— Capital Area Food Bank (@foodbankmetrodc) February 25, 2022

Lee District Supervisor Rodney Lusk said, over the last two years, over 3 million pounds of food had been provided to Lee and Mount Vernon district residents through food drops and distributions.

“Of that 3 million pounds, approximately 1.5 million has come from the Capital Area Food Bank,” he said. “So, this is a very needed thing in our area and what I’m hearing, which is almost unbelievable, is that there is still great need for food and we don’t see that basically truncating or dropping as a result of the change in the pandemic.”

In CFAB’s 2021 Hunger Report, a survey of more than 1,800 of its clients found that two-thirds of respondents visited a food pantry for the first time in the year prior to spring 2021. Nearly 90% of those respondents said their need for free food was a direct result of COVID-19.

The county expects to receive the American Rescue Plan Act funds it will allocate to the bank no sooner than spring, McKay said. The county is drafting an agreement to protect the funds if the project doesn’t move forward or if there are unexpected changes.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.