Fight Back Against Mold Illness with Help from Proactive Wellness Centers

CIRS Mold Toxicity Treatment in George Mason, VA

Experiencing mold toxicity is a terrifying thought for most people. Although it may seem like an interesting concept for a medical drama, nobody wants to experience the effects of mold exposure firsthand.

Mold is a fungus that thrives in wet environments, such as under tiles, wood floors, and ceilings, pipes, and roofs. While several types of mold exist, some are more hazardous than others, and some individuals may be allergic or sensitive to mycotoxins, the toxins that mold naturally produces. Exposure to excessive amounts of mold, or the types of mold that trigger health problems, can lead to mold toxicity and even CIRS - Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome. This acute and chronic systemic inflammatory response syndrome is typically acquired after exposure to mold or other producers of biotoxins, usually from damaged water buildings.

If you believe that you're suffering from mold toxicity or mold illness, it can seem like the world is folding in on you. No matter what you do, your symptoms persist, lowering your quality of life and eliminating your peace of mind. Fortunately, there is reason to be hopeful: Proactive Wellness Centers now offers a research-backed, highly effective mold illness poisoning treatment in George Mason, VA for men and women just like yourself and your children as well if they have been impacted.

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Understanding

CIRS and Mold Toxicity

CIRS and mold illness are on the rise, and accurate diagnosis of the issue plays a major role in this trend. Thanks to Dr. Ritchie Shoemaker, there is a huge body of evidence that covers diagnosing and treating patients with CIRS. Dr. Lawson is one of less than 30 practitioners in the United States that are fully certified by Dr. Shoemaker for diagnosing and treating CIRS. The body of evidence by Shoemaker and many associates is the largest body of scientific evidence that is published in major medical journals. Around 80% of CIRS/Mold cases are caused by indoor air contaminated with mold toxins and other triggers. However, it's important to note that CIRS can also be caused by biotoxin producers such as cyanobacteria and a marine dinoflagellate that produces the Ciguatera toxin found in certain types of fish.

When mold or biotoxins are not processed effectively, a series of biochemical changes known as the Biotoxin Pathway occur. Genetic studies have revealed that approximately 24% of individuals have a genetic makeup that makes them susceptible to developing an illness related to mold or biotoxins. The remaining 76% of the population can typically eliminate these toxins from their system and avoid the development of the Biotoxin Pathway that can lead to various diseases.

CIRS Treatment In George Mason George Mason, VA

CIRS and Mold Poisoning Misdiagnosis

CIRS and mold exposure symptoms overlap with many other chronic illnesses, which makes diagnosis challenging and can even lead to missed diagnosis of CIRS. Based on research from Proactive Wellness Centers, CIRS is frequently misdiagnosed. Some of the most common misdiagnoses include:

  • Lupus
  • Chronic Pain Syndrome
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Parkinson's Disease
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
  • PTSD
  • More

Lyme disease, in particular, is often misdiagnosed. We have treated a number of patients whose symptoms were in line with Lyme disease. Fortunately, we were able to confirm the presence of CIRS and mold and were able to successfully help those patients using CIRS treatment in George Mason, VA.

Note that many of these patients have CIRS and Lyme disease and in that case, it is necessary to treat both in order for full recovery. Treating one or the other will invariably leave the patient with debilitating symptoms and even more frustration with their medical team. At Proactive Wellness Centers, we are skilled In diagnosing and treating both.

 VA George Mason, VA
 CIRS Mold Toxicity Treatment In George Mason George Mason, VA

CIRS and Mold Poisoning Symptoms

If you're reading this page, chances are you're concerned that you might have CIRS or some form of mold poisoning. You may be wondering what you have - is it CIRS, or is it something else like Lyme disease? We can't provide the answer to that question without consultation and testing at our wellness center in Virginia. However, there are common symptoms of CIRS and mold toxicity you should know.

Some of the most common symptoms of CIRS include:

  • Fatigue
  • Decreased Word Finding
  • Headaches
  • Difficulty Concentrating
  • Morning Stiffness
  • Tremors
  • Excessive Thirst
  • Tingling
  • Night Sweats
  • Frequent Urination
  • Confusion
  • Mood Swings

Proactive Wellness Centers'

Tools for Diagnosing Mold Sickness and CIRS

Identifying and confirming if a patient is being impacted by CIRS and identifying the cause and source of the biotoxin are the two main steps in diagnosing CIRS and Mold Exposure. To diagnose CIRS and Mold Exposure, the following diagnostic tools are commonly used:

To learn more about the debilitating symptoms of mold sickness and to find out whether you have CIRS or something else, contact Proactive Wellness Centers. Our team of medical professionals is here to help you every step of the way.

 VA George Mason, VA

Hope for Patients with CIRS: Proactive Wellness Centers' Mold Illness Treatment in George Mason, VA

Our approach to treating CIRS utilizes integrative and functional medicine, The Shoemaker Protocol along with the latest evidence-based approaches to treating mold illness and the related secondary issues that it causes. We begin by utilizing advanced diagnostics to confirm the presence of the condition and identify the specific environment causing continued exposure to biotoxins. Next, we take a stepwise approach to halt the progression of the disease, eliminate biotoxins from the body, and reverse any damage to cellular structures. Our goal is to help patients achieve a full recovery.

To do this, we not only have to identify the primary condition like CIRS or Lyme disease, but we then have to continue looking to see if you have any of the common secondary conditions like reactivated EBV, Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS), and others. Once we understand the totally of your condition, then we can implement a treatment plan tailored for you. Yes, it will leverage the Shoemaker protocol, but we have found that we have to extend the protocol to cover the secondary issues that we uncover.

The steps we follow to reach that goal include:

In order to initiate the recovery process, it is important to address and resolve any affected areas, or, alternatively, relocate the patient from that environment if necessary. Prolonged exposure to mold can hinder the success of the treatment plan and impede the healing process.

Two commonly used binding agents in the process of treating Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome are Welchol and Cholestyramine. Cholestyramine is particularly effective in binding biotoxins that are processed in the liver's bile ducts and helps to eliminate them from the body. It has been scientifically proven, through placebo-controlled studies, to reverse multiple aspects of the inflammatory process associated with CIRS.

Many individuals experiencing mold sickness and other chronic inflammatory illnesses may have a staph infection called MARCoNS (Multiple Antibiotic Resistant Coagulase Negative Staphylococci) residing deep in their nasal cavities. This infection is resistant to antibiotics and needs to be eliminated for the patient to fully recover.

Each patient requires a customized plan based on the affected areas and CIRS severity. Retesting is necessary after each step to confirm balance restoration. Testing may include some or all of the following:
  • VIP
  • TGF Beta 1
  • MMP9
  • ADH
  • Antigliadin
  • Androgen Imbalance
  • C4a
  • More

In order to halt the growth of mold fungi, patients need to avoid foods that can cause mycotoxins. Some examples of these foods include:
  • Barley
  • Cottonseed
  • Peanuts
  • Corn
  • Black Pepper
  • Figs
  • Rice
  • Bread
  • Beans
  • More
Proactive Wellness has a proven track record of treating patients who have experienced severe health issues without any clear explanation. Unlike other "syndromes," our diagnosis process involves specific tests to confirm a diagnosis rather than simply ruling out other diseases.
 CIRS Mold Poisoning Treatment In George Mason George Mason, VA

Fibromyalgia, Lupus, Chronic Fatigue, and Chronic Pain Syndrome are examples of illnesses that are often diagnosed without such confirmatory tests. If you are experiencing unexplained health issues or have been exposed to water-damaged buildings, it is possible that you are suffering from CIRS or a mold illness.

The good news is that we can diagnose and address this disease with a mold illness treatment program in George Mason, VA tailored to your body and your symptoms. That way, we can help you regain your health as soon as possible.

Be Wary of These

5 Symptoms of Mold Exposure

Mold spores can easily be brought into your home on your shoes or clothing or through open windows or doors. If these spores can find a warm, damp, humid environment, they can begin to multiply. Soon, your home can be filled with toxic mold. If you think mold has invaded your home or another environment, like in an office or warehouse, it's important for you to know about the symptoms.

Unfortunately, diagnosing mold issues can be exceptionally difficult. But why? The answer can be quite frustrating.

Understanding the Difficulty of Diagnosing Mold Symptoms

Many doctors fail to recognize the impact of mycotoxins emitted by certain indoor mold species, which can lead to chemical and inflammatory reactions. While conventional medicine acknowledges that mold can cause allergies, it may overlook this crucial aspect of mold-related health issues.

This can happen for several reasons:

  • Standardized treatment protocols for mold toxicity are offered mostly by Functional/Integrative physicians as the conventional physicians are not on board despite over 20 years of published research. Due to this issue, patients spend precious months/years going from doctor to doctor in the conventional channel with no answers.
  • Though ERMI testing has been accepted in the integrative/functional medical community, there isn't a "gold standard" in mold testing that is universally accepted.
  • Mold symptoms can manifest in vastly different ways depending on the patient.
VA George Mason, VA

After understanding the points above, it's no wonder that mold poisoning can be hard to diagnose. Fortunately, integrative and functional holistic medicine providers and wellness centers like Proactive Wellness are flipping the proverbial script. Unlike traditional clinics, our team considers environmental factors that can affect patient health and has advanced training to provide mold poisoning treatment in George Mason, VA.

Now that you understand why mold symptoms are so hard to diagnose let's take a closer look at five of the most common indicators of mold sickness.

 Mold Toxicity Symptoms George Mason, VA

Fatigue

Fatigue is probably the number one symptom of well over 90% of CIRS patients. The level of fatigue varies from 5 on a 10 point scale all the way to 10 on a 10 point scale. Many patients can no longer work or remain productive as in the worst cases, the fatigue is overwhelming. College students living in moldy dorms frequently have to drop out of school until the illness is treated effectively. Older adults have to retire or stop working due the fatigue. If you have overwhelming fatigue, CIRS may be a major contributor to your illness.

 Mold Poisoning Symtoms George Mason, VA

Breathing Problems

Exposure to mold can cause a host of respiratory problems, such as breathing difficulties, allergies, and asthma, especially in individuals with a weakened immune system. Mold can worsen asthma, irritate the nasal passages, lungs, and throat, and lead to symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, sneezing, sore throat, and nasal congestion. Other health issues such as hypersensitivity pneumonitis, sinus congestion, allergic rhinitis, asthma, and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis have also been associated with mold sickness.

 Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Treatment George Mason, VA

Sadness and Depression

Mold can cause a variety of illnesses that can show up in different ways, such as psychological symptoms like anxiety, depression, insomnia, concentration problems, and memory loss. It has been reported that nearly 40% of people who live in moldy homes experience depression. Researchers suggest that exposure to toxic mold and dealing with the physical symptoms of mold illness can contribute to mental health issues.

Due to this phenomenon, many mold patients are given antidepressant medications in the conventional channels.

 Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Symptoms George Mason, VA

Feeling "Pins and Needles"

Numbness, twitching, or tingling in the extremities, such as hands, feet, legs, and arms, is another symptom of mold illness. The sensation is similar to pins and needles, which are often felt when the body is held in an uncomfortable position for a long time. While this sensation can indicate serious nerve damage or disease, it can also be a symptom of mold sickness.

CIRS Treatment In George Mason George Mason, VA

Digestion Problems and Disorders

When exposed to mold, individuals may experience various digestive problems. Some may lose their appetite, leading to unintentional weight loss. Others may suffer from stomach pain, nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting. Furthermore, the influx of mold spores may trigger systemic inflammation, causing bloating and weight gain due to the digestive system's exposure to harmful mold.

Top Tips for

Controlling Mold in Your Environment

It's not possible to completely eliminate all mold and mold spores from your home or place of work. However, since mold spores need moisture to grow, the best way to prevent or get rid of growth is to reduce the moisture in your environment. If you already have mold growing there, it's important to clean it up and address the issue causing dampness. If you only clean up the mold and don't address the underlying problem, the mold is likely to return.

Here are some tips to help reduce moisture throughout your home or office:

  • Use A/C or Dehumidifiers. This is especially important if you live in a hot, humid area of the United States.
  • Ensure A/C drip pans are clean, dry, and obstruction-free.
  • Thoroughly dry areas that are damp or wet within 48 hours.
  • Be sure to install insulation in cold areas like your home's exterior walls and windows. Doing so will reduce condensation.
  • Work with an HVAC company to check your HVAC system. Doing so can help ensure your unit is removing as much humidity as possible.
  • Keep the humidity in your home below 60% whenever possible.
 CIRS Mold Toxicity Treatment In George Mason George Mason, VA
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Here are some tips to help reduce moisture in your kitchen:

  • Check for leaks near your ice makers, sinks, and anywhere else water is present.
  • Make sure your exhaust fans are directing moisture outside, not into your attic.
  • If you notice your appliances are causing moisture on windows and other surfaces, turn them off as soon as you're done using them.

Here are some tips to help reduce moisture in crawlspaces:

  • Use a plastic covering on the dirt in your crawlspace. Doing so will prevent moisture from saturating the ground.
  • Ensure that your crawlspace or basement is ventilated well.
  • Check your home's gutters. Make sure they're directing water away from your property, not toward your foundation or crawlspace.

Your Top Choice for

Mold Toxicity Treatment in George Mason, VA

Trying to "tough it out" through life with CIRS isn't any way to live. If you're suffering from the effects of biotoxin illness, you should know that there are solutions available to help you reclaim your health and your life. With the help of a can-do attitude, healthy living, and mold illness treatment from Proactive Wellness, there's light at the end of the dark tunnel you're trapped within. Contact our office today to get started on your first step toward recovery!

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Latest News in George Mason, VA

A George Mason walk-on was surprised with a full basketball scholarship. His teammates had a priceless reaction

Kam Johnson was originally a walk-on player for the men's basketball team. That changed Saturday after a special postgame announcement by the team's head coach.FAIRFAX, Va. — The George Mason University men's basketball team celebrated a big win Saturday inside EagleBank Arena over North Carolina A&T. The team reached 11 non-league victories for the second time ever i...

Kam Johnson was originally a walk-on player for the men's basketball team. That changed Saturday after a special postgame announcement by the team's head coach.

FAIRFAX, Va. — The George Mason University men's basketball team celebrated a big win Saturday inside EagleBank Arena over North Carolina A&T. The team reached 11 non-league victories for the second time ever in the last 40 years.

But it's what happened after the game that has a lot of people talking. Kam Johnson, a walk-on player, scored his first career 3-pointer yesterday. Postgame, Head Coach Tony Skinn had a special message for Johnson in the locker room in front of the entire team.

"This week I think it's safe to say my man Kam was giving ya'll that work," said Skinn.

In a video posted by the George Mason Men's Basketball team to X, Skinn went on to praise Johnson's recent accomplishments, announcing he was receiving a full scholarship.

After the announcement, the entire team starts cheering and lifts Johnson in the air in the locker room to celebrate another big win of the night.

Coach Skinn had a special message for Kam postgame … pic.twitter.com/WAiEuM0eW1

— George Mason Men's Basketball (@MasonMBB) December 30, 2023

Johnson is a junior from Charles City County, Virginia, according to the team's roster. This has been a successful season for the team now led by Skinn, who helped lead 11th-seeded George Mason to the Final Four during March Madness as a player in 2006, was hired earlier this year as head coach.

Skinn was most recently an assistant coach at Maryland. He also has worked at Ohio State, Seton Hall and Louisiana Tech.

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US Air Force, George Mason University partner to modernize Warfighter mission training, education and research

FAIRFAX, Va. (AFNS) -- Headquarters Ninth Air Force, U.S. Air Forces Central, formalized a partnership with George Mason University for joint research, rapid capability development, warfighter training and education to support command mission readiness. The Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was signed July 14, at the George Mason University Fairfax Campus by Mark Ginsberg, GMU provost, and ...

FAIRFAX, Va. (AFNS) --

Headquarters Ninth Air Force, U.S. Air Forces Central, formalized a partnership with George Mason University for joint research, rapid capability development, warfighter training and education to support command mission readiness. The Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was signed July 14, at the George Mason University Fairfax Campus by Mark Ginsberg, GMU provost, and Lt. Gen. Alexus Grynkewich, Ninth Air Force commander.

“Mason is committed to access to excellence in education and innovative student learning experiences, while providing cutting-edge breakthrough research and capabilities to address the nation’s greatest challenges more quickly,” Ginsberg said. “This partnership will strengthen Mason’s unique approach to supporting our military professionals and provide the Air Force access to the world-class thought leadership of the largest, most innovative public research university in Virginia. This model of shared research and curriculum development with the Air Force opens opportunities for additional collaborations with public and governmental organizations.”

“We’re very thankful for this partnership with George Mason, where we see tremendous opportunities for collaboration, thinking creatively and building a culture of innovation,” Grynkewich said.

The partnership will include applied research and development programs with the Volgenau School of Engineering’s national security and defense teams Mason’s Rapid Prototyping Research center, along with digital transformation efforts coordinated through Mason’s Institute for Digital InnovAtion. USAFCENT personnel will also gain access to customized executive, continuing and professional education programs, along with specialized graduate and PhD programs offered through Mason’s School of Business and College of Engineering and Computing.

“As the most diverse and innovative university in the commonwealth, Mason is meeting today’s needs and inspiring future insights of public and private sector organizations,” said School of Business Dean, Ajay Vinzé. “By providing multiple pathways for all students, Mason is fueling success in both the public and private sectors. As a highly ranked university for business analytics, this collaboration will provide direct impact and a transformative experience for the men and women of the Ninth Air Force and beyond.”

“Our relationship with Mason has grown since August 2022, as they collaborated with us early on our journey to become a data-centric organization through delivery of customized data-driven decision-making and senior leadership programs executed by School of Business faculty and Executive Development teams,” said Lt. Col. Chaz LeDeatte, chief technology and data officer. “By December of 2022, the success of the relationship sparked interest in expanding to a formal partnership with Mason across multiple disciplines.”

Leaders from Mason’s School of Business, the Volgenau School of Engineering and the Institute for Digital InnovAtion began working with USAFCENT warfighters and senior leaders to design research and curriculum. They included programs in innovation and creativity, digital transformation, applied research in systems engineering and integration, program management and military transition of advanced technologies.

“Collaboration efforts will prioritize refining our digital education program, freeing the data, digital and unmanned tech operational validation, and making our air bases more efficient and effective,” said Lt. Col. LeDeatte. Additionally, Mason and USAFCENT will collaborate on projects related to accelerating the digital capabilities in areas to include digital transformation, cyber security and resiliency, sensor fusion and anomaly detection, predictive analytics, systems engineering, 5G and data analytic capabilities at the battlefield edge, as well as advances in robotics, autonomous vehicles, smart cities and unmanned aerial systems, among other collaborations.

U.S. Air Force and George Mason University Partner to Modernize Warfighter Mission Training, Education and Research

FAIRFAX, Va. (July 17, 2023) – Headquarters Ninth Air Force (U.S. Air Forces Central) formalized a partnership with George Mason University for joint research, rapid capability development, warfighter training, and education to support the mission readiness of the Ninth Air Force. The Educational Partner Agreement (EPA) was signed on July 14, 2023, at Mason’s Fairfax Campus by Mason Provost Mark Ginsberg and Lieutenant General Alexus Grynkewich, Commander, Ninth Air Force (U.S. Air Forces Central).“M...

FAIRFAX, Va. (July 17, 2023) – Headquarters Ninth Air Force (U.S. Air Forces Central) formalized a partnership with George Mason University for joint research, rapid capability development, warfighter training, and education to support the mission readiness of the Ninth Air Force. The Educational Partner Agreement (EPA) was signed on July 14, 2023, at Mason’s Fairfax Campus by Mason Provost Mark Ginsberg and Lieutenant General Alexus Grynkewich, Commander, Ninth Air Force (U.S. Air Forces Central).

“Mason is committed to access to excellence in education and innovative student learning experiences, while providing cutting-edge breakthrough research and capabilities to address the nation’s greatest challenges more quickly, said Provost Ginsberg. “This partnership will strengthen Mason’s unique approach to supporting our military professionals and provide the Air Force access to the world-class thought leadership of the largest, most innovative public research university in Virginia. This model of shared research and curriculum development with the Air Force opens opportunities for additional collaborations with public and governmental organizations.”

“We’re very thankful for this partnership with George Mason, where we see tremendous opportunities for collaboration, thinking creatively, and building a culture of innovation,” said Lt. General Grynkewich.

The partnership will include applied research and development programs with the College of Engineering and Computing's national security and defense teams Mason’s Rapid Prototyping Research Center along with digital transformation efforts coordinated through Mason’s Institute for Digital Innovation. Ninth Air Force personnel will also gain access to customized executive, continuing, and professional education programs, along with specialized graduate and PhD programs offered through Mason’s School of Business and College of Engineering and Computing.

“As the most diverse and innovative university in the commonwealth, Mason is meeting today’s needs and inspiring future insights of public and private sector organizations,” said School of Business Dean Ajay Vinzé. “By providing multiple pathways for all students, Mason is fueling success in both the public and private sectors. As a highly ranked university for business analytics, this collaboration will provide direct impact and a transformative experience for the men and women of the Ninth Air Force and beyond.”

"Our relationship with Mason has grown since August 2022, as they collaborated with us early on our journey to become a data-centric organization through delivery of customized data-driven decision-making and senior leadership programs executed by School of Business faculty and Executive Development teams," said Lieutenant Colonel Chaz LeDeatte, Chief Technology and Data Officer. "By December of 2022, the success of the relationship sparked interest in expanding to a formal partnership with Mason across multiple disciplines."

Leaders from Mason’s School of Business, the College of Engineering and Computing, and the Institute for Digital Innovation began working with AFCENT warfighters and senior leaders to design research and curriculum. They included programs in innovation and creativity, digital transformation, applied research in systems engineering and integration, program management, and military transition of advanced technologies.

"Collaboration efforts will prioritize refining our digital education program, freeing the data, digital and unmanned tech operational validation, and making our air bases more efficient and effective," said. Lt. Col. LeDeatte.

Additionally, Mason and AFCENT will collaborate on projects related to accelerating the digital capabilities in areas to include digital transformation, cyber security and resiliency, sensor fusion and anomaly detection, predictive analytics, systems engineering, and 5G and data analytics capabilities at the battlefield's edge, as well as advances in robotics, autonomous vehicles, smart cities, and unmanned aerial systems, among other collaborations.

About Ninth Air Force Central (U.S. Air Force Central)

Ninth Air Force is the air component of United States Central Command, a joint Department of Defense combatant command responsible for U.S. security interests in 27 nations that stretch from the Horn of Africa through the Persian Gulf region, into Central Asia. USAFCENT is responsible for air operations, either unilaterally or in concert with coalition partners, and developing contingency plans in support of national objectives for USCENTCOM’s 21-nation area of responsibility in Southwest Asia. Additionally, USAFCENT manages an extensive supply and equipment prepositioning program at several Area of Responsibility sites. USAFCENT is headquartered at Shaw Air Force Base in South Carolina. Learn more at www.afcent.af.mil.

About George Mason University

George Mason University is Virginia’s largest public research university. Located near Washington, D.C., Mason enrolls nearly 40,000 students from 130 countries and all 50 states. Mason has grown rapidly over the past half-century and is recognized for its innovation and entrepreneurship, remarkable diversity and commitment to accessibility. In 2023, the university launched Mason Now: Power the Possible, a one billion dollar comprehensive campaign to support student success, research, innovation, community, and sustainability. Learn more at gmu.edu.

Annual Celebration of Distinction honors alumni leaders

The George Mason University Alumni Association’s annual Celebration of Distinction recognizes outstanding alumni, faculty members, and students. This year’s celebration was held October 20 at the Hilton McLean Tysons Corner.Here are this year’s five honorees:...

The George Mason University Alumni Association’s annual Celebration of Distinction recognizes outstanding alumni, faculty members, and students. This year’s celebration was held October 20 at the Hilton McLean Tysons Corner.

Here are this year’s five honorees:

Shaza L. Andersen, BA Area Studies ’89, is Alumna of the Year. She is the founder and CEO of Trustar Bank. In 2018 as CEO of WashingtonFirst Bank, Andersen completed the largest banking deal in the Mid-Atlantic region with the company’s $489 million sale to Sandy Spring Bancorp. She has been named among the Top 25 Women to Watch by American Banker and is a two-time Top Banker honoree by SmartCEO magazine. She has been named twice to the Top 100 Powerful Women list by Washingtonian magazine, designated as one of the Power 100 by the Washington Business Journal, and chosen as a March of Dimes Corporate Heroine. Andersen received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree during Mason’s 2021 Winter Graduation, where she was the featured speaker.

Brandon O. Thompson, BS Administration of Justice ’08, received the Alumni Service Award. He is the executive officer in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Office of the Inspector General, where he is an advisor to executives overseeing more than 1,100 employees across 60 divisions. A dedicated volunteer, Thompson has provided students with career advice through Mason’s University Career Services since 2016. He also mentors College of Humanities and Social Sciences students through LinkUp, professional networking events that connect students with alumni. He is also a youth instructor at his church and volunteers with his homeowners’ association.

Cordelia Cranshaw Skeete, BSW ’14, received the Graduate of the Last Decade (G.O.L.D.) Award. Skeete is a licensed clinical social worker and the founder of the nonprofit Acts of Random Kindness, which provides resources for children and families facing such challenges as incarcerated parents, housing insecurity, and foster care. A former foster care youth herself, she practices cognitive behavioral therapy with clients who have experienced trauma, anxiety, or depression. In 2019, Skeete was named Miss District of Columbia and placed in the top 10 during that year’s Miss USA Pageant. She is a motivational speaker and has created the guide Survivor to Thriver to help others overcome trauma through healing and relationship building.

Keith Renshaw is Faculty Member of the Year. In August, he was appointed associate provost of undergraduate education. He was previously chair of the Psychology Department and director of Mason’s Military, Veterans, and Families Initiative, which he founded in 2020. The winner of multiple teaching and mentorship awards, he was named a fellow of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies in 2021. Renshaw has also served as Faculty Senate chair and as the faculty representative to the Board of Visitors.

Hannah Adamson, BA Conflict Analysis and Resolution ’23, is Senior of the Year. She is currently a student in the accelerated master’s program in conflict analysis and resolution. As treasurer of the Student Environmental Justice Alliance, Adamson co-created the first Virginia Environmental Justice Summit in 2020. She works at the Carter School’s Mary Hoch Center for Reconciliation and is also a program manager at the Think Peace Learning and Support Hub for a project in the Horn of Africa focused on mental health, psychosocial support, and peacebuilding. Adamson has completed fieldwork in Finland and Kenya and plans to pursue a career focused on community-led environmental and social healing programs.

In addition to the five honorees, 16 alumni received Distinguished Alumni Awards from their school, college, or affinity alumni chapter at this year’s October event.

For the full list, please visit the Alumni Association website.

Mason gears up to celebrate the Class of 2023

George Mason University will graduate its largest class in history this week, and perhaps its most traveled as well—the nearly 11,000 honorees hail from 111 countries, 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and military installations.Spring Commencement is set for 10 a.m. Thursday, May 18, at EagleBank Arena on the Fairfax Campus, with doors opening at 8:30 a.m. ...

George Mason University will graduate its largest class in history this week, and perhaps its most traveled as well—the nearly 11,000 honorees hail from 111 countries, 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and military installations.

Spring Commencement is set for 10 a.m. Thursday, May 18, at EagleBank Arena on the Fairfax Campus, with doors opening at 8:30 a.m. Tickets are required for guests to enter the arena, and wristbands are required for students.

Mason, the largest and most diverse public university in Virginia, will award 10,220 degrees for graduates who have filed an intent to graduate from Summer 2022, Fall 2022, and Spring 2023. The university also will award 721 certificates.

Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin is the featured speaker, continuing a long tradition of the state’s chief executive addressing Mason graduates. Galilea Sejas-Machado, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in sociology and another in criminology, law and society, is the student speaker.

The university will present its highest honor, the Mason Medal, to Kimmy Duong, a Northern Virginia tech entrepreneur who supports Mason in many ways, including by awarding scholarships through her foundation.

The Class of 2023 reflects the university’s mission of access as well as its leading role in supplying tech talent to the region. About one in four graduates reports that they are first-generation degree earners and one in three bachelor’s degree recipients are in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Two of the top three master’s programs with the most 2023 graduates are data analytics engineering and computer science, and two of the top five doctorate majors are information technology and computer science.

The new graduates might find encouragement in the success of their predecessors. According to a Mason Career Plans Survey, 87% of Class of 2022 graduates report a positive career outcome with a median salary of $72,000.

Some Commencement day procedures for graduates and their guests have been changed. Graduates participating in Spring Commencement must check in with their Mason ID or G# at Wilkins Plaza no later than 9 a.m. Thursday to receive a wristband, then line up for the procession to the arena.

Non-ticketed guests and students without wristbands will be directed to the Concert Hall at the Center for the Arts on Mason Pond Drive where they can watch the ceremony live on screen. The livestream will be available on Mason’s mainYouTube channel and on the Mason homepage.

As in previous ceremonies, doctoral candidates will be individually recognized and hooded. Graduates receiving bachelor’s and master’s degrees will be recognized as a group at their seats.

The top five undergraduate majors among the 6,265 undergraduates in the Class of 2023 are business; information technology; psychology; criminology, law and society; and computer science.

For the 3,478 students earning master’s degrees, the top five majors are data analytics engineering, curriculum and instruction, computer science, special education, and business administration.

The top majors for the 337 students earning doctoral degrees are education, psychology, economics, information technology, and computer science.

There also are 140 law school graduates. The Scalia Law School will hold a convocation Friday at the Center for the Arts.

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