Fight Back Against Mold Illness with Help from Proactive Wellness Centers

CIRS Mold Toxicity Treatment in Lincolnia, VA

Experiencing mold toxicity is a terrifying thought for most people. Although it may seem like an interesting concept for a medical drama, nobody wants to experience the effects of mold exposure firsthand.

Mold is a fungus that thrives in wet environments, such as under tiles, wood floors, and ceilings, pipes, and roofs. While several types of mold exist, some are more hazardous than others, and some individuals may be allergic or sensitive to mycotoxins, the toxins that mold naturally produces. Exposure to excessive amounts of mold, or the types of mold that trigger health problems, can lead to mold toxicity and even CIRS - Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome. This acute and chronic systemic inflammatory response syndrome is typically acquired after exposure to mold or other producers of biotoxins, usually from damaged water buildings.

If you believe that you're suffering from mold toxicity or mold illness, it can seem like the world is folding in on you. No matter what you do, your symptoms persist, lowering your quality of life and eliminating your peace of mind. Fortunately, there is reason to be hopeful: Proactive Wellness Centers now offers a research-backed, highly effective mold illness poisoning treatment in Lincolnia, VA for men and women just like yourself and your children as well if they have been impacted.

Service Areas

Understanding

CIRS and Mold Toxicity

CIRS and mold illness are on the rise, and accurate diagnosis of the issue plays a major role in this trend. Thanks to Dr. Ritchie Shoemaker, there is a huge body of evidence that covers diagnosing and treating patients with CIRS. Dr. Lawson is one of less than 30 practitioners in the United States that are fully certified by Dr. Shoemaker for diagnosing and treating CIRS. The body of evidence by Shoemaker and many associates is the largest body of scientific evidence that is published in major medical journals. Around 80% of CIRS/Mold cases are caused by indoor air contaminated with mold toxins and other triggers. However, it's important to note that CIRS can also be caused by biotoxin producers such as cyanobacteria and a marine dinoflagellate that produces the Ciguatera toxin found in certain types of fish.

When mold or biotoxins are not processed effectively, a series of biochemical changes known as the Biotoxin Pathway occur. Genetic studies have revealed that approximately 24% of individuals have a genetic makeup that makes them susceptible to developing an illness related to mold or biotoxins. The remaining 76% of the population can typically eliminate these toxins from their system and avoid the development of the Biotoxin Pathway that can lead to various diseases.

CIRS Treatment In Lincolnia Lincolnia, VA

CIRS and Mold Poisoning Misdiagnosis

CIRS and mold exposure symptoms overlap with many other chronic illnesses, which makes diagnosis challenging and can even lead to missed diagnosis of CIRS. Based on research from Proactive Wellness Centers, CIRS is frequently misdiagnosed. Some of the most common misdiagnoses include:

  • Lupus
  • Chronic Pain Syndrome
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Parkinson's Disease
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
  • PTSD
  • More

Lyme disease, in particular, is often misdiagnosed. We have treated a number of patients whose symptoms were in line with Lyme disease. Fortunately, we were able to confirm the presence of CIRS and mold and were able to successfully help those patients using CIRS treatment in Lincolnia, VA.

Note that many of these patients have CIRS and Lyme disease and in that case, it is necessary to treat both in order for full recovery. Treating one or the other will invariably leave the patient with debilitating symptoms and even more frustration with their medical team. At Proactive Wellness Centers, we are skilled In diagnosing and treating both.

 VA Lincolnia, VA
 CIRS Mold Toxicity Treatment In Lincolnia Lincolnia, VA

CIRS and Mold Poisoning Symptoms

If you're reading this page, chances are you're concerned that you might have CIRS or some form of mold poisoning. You may be wondering what you have - is it CIRS, or is it something else like Lyme disease? We can't provide the answer to that question without consultation and testing at our wellness center in Virginia. However, there are common symptoms of CIRS and mold toxicity you should know.

Some of the most common symptoms of CIRS include:

  • Fatigue
  • Decreased Word Finding
  • Headaches
  • Difficulty Concentrating
  • Morning Stiffness
  • Tremors
  • Excessive Thirst
  • Tingling
  • Night Sweats
  • Frequent Urination
  • Confusion
  • Mood Swings

Proactive Wellness Centers'

Tools for Diagnosing Mold Sickness and CIRS

Identifying and confirming if a patient is being impacted by CIRS and identifying the cause and source of the biotoxin are the two main steps in diagnosing CIRS and Mold Exposure. To diagnose CIRS and Mold Exposure, the following diagnostic tools are commonly used:

To learn more about the debilitating symptoms of mold sickness and to find out whether you have CIRS or something else, contact Proactive Wellness Centers. Our team of medical professionals is here to help you every step of the way.

 VA Lincolnia, VA

Hope for Patients with CIRS: Proactive Wellness Centers' Mold Illness Treatment in Lincolnia, VA

Our approach to treating CIRS utilizes integrative and functional medicine, The Shoemaker Protocol along with the latest evidence-based approaches to treating mold illness and the related secondary issues that it causes. We begin by utilizing advanced diagnostics to confirm the presence of the condition and identify the specific environment causing continued exposure to biotoxins. Next, we take a stepwise approach to halt the progression of the disease, eliminate biotoxins from the body, and reverse any damage to cellular structures. Our goal is to help patients achieve a full recovery.

To do this, we not only have to identify the primary condition like CIRS or Lyme disease, but we then have to continue looking to see if you have any of the common secondary conditions like reactivated EBV, Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS), and others. Once we understand the totally of your condition, then we can implement a treatment plan tailored for you. Yes, it will leverage the Shoemaker protocol, but we have found that we have to extend the protocol to cover the secondary issues that we uncover.

The steps we follow to reach that goal include:

In order to initiate the recovery process, it is important to address and resolve any affected areas, or, alternatively, relocate the patient from that environment if necessary. Prolonged exposure to mold can hinder the success of the treatment plan and impede the healing process.

Two commonly used binding agents in the process of treating Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome are Welchol and Cholestyramine. Cholestyramine is particularly effective in binding biotoxins that are processed in the liver's bile ducts and helps to eliminate them from the body. It has been scientifically proven, through placebo-controlled studies, to reverse multiple aspects of the inflammatory process associated with CIRS.

Many individuals experiencing mold sickness and other chronic inflammatory illnesses may have a staph infection called MARCoNS (Multiple Antibiotic Resistant Coagulase Negative Staphylococci) residing deep in their nasal cavities. This infection is resistant to antibiotics and needs to be eliminated for the patient to fully recover.

Each patient requires a customized plan based on the affected areas and CIRS severity. Retesting is necessary after each step to confirm balance restoration. Testing may include some or all of the following:
  • VIP
  • TGF Beta 1
  • MMP9
  • ADH
  • Antigliadin
  • Androgen Imbalance
  • C4a
  • More

In order to halt the growth of mold fungi, patients need to avoid foods that can cause mycotoxins. Some examples of these foods include:
  • Barley
  • Cottonseed
  • Peanuts
  • Corn
  • Black Pepper
  • Figs
  • Rice
  • Bread
  • Beans
  • More
Proactive Wellness has a proven track record of treating patients who have experienced severe health issues without any clear explanation. Unlike other "syndromes," our diagnosis process involves specific tests to confirm a diagnosis rather than simply ruling out other diseases.
 CIRS Mold Poisoning Treatment In Lincolnia Lincolnia, VA

Fibromyalgia, Lupus, Chronic Fatigue, and Chronic Pain Syndrome are examples of illnesses that are often diagnosed without such confirmatory tests. If you are experiencing unexplained health issues or have been exposed to water-damaged buildings, it is possible that you are suffering from CIRS or a mold illness.

The good news is that we can diagnose and address this disease with a mold illness treatment program in Lincolnia, VA tailored to your body and your symptoms. That way, we can help you regain your health as soon as possible.

Be Wary of These

5 Symptoms of Mold Exposure

Mold spores can easily be brought into your home on your shoes or clothing or through open windows or doors. If these spores can find a warm, damp, humid environment, they can begin to multiply. Soon, your home can be filled with toxic mold. If you think mold has invaded your home or another environment, like in an office or warehouse, it's important for you to know about the symptoms.

Unfortunately, diagnosing mold issues can be exceptionally difficult. But why? The answer can be quite frustrating.

Understanding the Difficulty of Diagnosing Mold Symptoms

Many doctors fail to recognize the impact of mycotoxins emitted by certain indoor mold species, which can lead to chemical and inflammatory reactions. While conventional medicine acknowledges that mold can cause allergies, it may overlook this crucial aspect of mold-related health issues.

This can happen for several reasons:

  • Standardized treatment protocols for mold toxicity are offered mostly by Functional/Integrative physicians as the conventional physicians are not on board despite over 20 years of published research. Due to this issue, patients spend precious months/years going from doctor to doctor in the conventional channel with no answers.
  • Though ERMI testing has been accepted in the integrative/functional medical community, there isn't a "gold standard" in mold testing that is universally accepted.
  • Mold symptoms can manifest in vastly different ways depending on the patient.
VA Lincolnia, VA

After understanding the points above, it's no wonder that mold poisoning can be hard to diagnose. Fortunately, integrative and functional holistic medicine providers and wellness centers like Proactive Wellness are flipping the proverbial script. Unlike traditional clinics, our team considers environmental factors that can affect patient health and has advanced training to provide mold poisoning treatment in Lincolnia, VA.

Now that you understand why mold symptoms are so hard to diagnose let's take a closer look at five of the most common indicators of mold sickness.

 Mold Toxicity Symptoms Lincolnia, VA

Fatigue

Fatigue is probably the number one symptom of well over 90% of CIRS patients. The level of fatigue varies from 5 on a 10 point scale all the way to 10 on a 10 point scale. Many patients can no longer work or remain productive as in the worst cases, the fatigue is overwhelming. College students living in moldy dorms frequently have to drop out of school until the illness is treated effectively. Older adults have to retire or stop working due the fatigue. If you have overwhelming fatigue, CIRS may be a major contributor to your illness.

 Mold Poisoning Symtoms Lincolnia, VA

Breathing Problems

Exposure to mold can cause a host of respiratory problems, such as breathing difficulties, allergies, and asthma, especially in individuals with a weakened immune system. Mold can worsen asthma, irritate the nasal passages, lungs, and throat, and lead to symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, sneezing, sore throat, and nasal congestion. Other health issues such as hypersensitivity pneumonitis, sinus congestion, allergic rhinitis, asthma, and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis have also been associated with mold sickness.

 Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Treatment Lincolnia, VA

Sadness and Depression

Mold can cause a variety of illnesses that can show up in different ways, such as psychological symptoms like anxiety, depression, insomnia, concentration problems, and memory loss. It has been reported that nearly 40% of people who live in moldy homes experience depression. Researchers suggest that exposure to toxic mold and dealing with the physical symptoms of mold illness can contribute to mental health issues.

Due to this phenomenon, many mold patients are given antidepressant medications in the conventional channels.

 Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Symptoms Lincolnia, VA

Feeling "Pins and Needles"

Numbness, twitching, or tingling in the extremities, such as hands, feet, legs, and arms, is another symptom of mold illness. The sensation is similar to pins and needles, which are often felt when the body is held in an uncomfortable position for a long time. While this sensation can indicate serious nerve damage or disease, it can also be a symptom of mold sickness.

CIRS Treatment In Lincolnia Lincolnia, VA

Digestion Problems and Disorders

When exposed to mold, individuals may experience various digestive problems. Some may lose their appetite, leading to unintentional weight loss. Others may suffer from stomach pain, nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting. Furthermore, the influx of mold spores may trigger systemic inflammation, causing bloating and weight gain due to the digestive system's exposure to harmful mold.

Top Tips for

Controlling Mold in Your Environment

It's not possible to completely eliminate all mold and mold spores from your home or place of work. However, since mold spores need moisture to grow, the best way to prevent or get rid of growth is to reduce the moisture in your environment. If you already have mold growing there, it's important to clean it up and address the issue causing dampness. If you only clean up the mold and don't address the underlying problem, the mold is likely to return.

Here are some tips to help reduce moisture throughout your home or office:

  • Use A/C or Dehumidifiers. This is especially important if you live in a hot, humid area of the United States.
  • Ensure A/C drip pans are clean, dry, and obstruction-free.
  • Thoroughly dry areas that are damp or wet within 48 hours.
  • Be sure to install insulation in cold areas like your home's exterior walls and windows. Doing so will reduce condensation.
  • Work with an HVAC company to check your HVAC system. Doing so can help ensure your unit is removing as much humidity as possible.
  • Keep the humidity in your home below 60% whenever possible.
 CIRS Mold Toxicity Treatment In Lincolnia Lincolnia, VA
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Here are some tips to help reduce moisture in your kitchen:

  • Check for leaks near your ice makers, sinks, and anywhere else water is present.
  • Make sure your exhaust fans are directing moisture outside, not into your attic.
  • If you notice your appliances are causing moisture on windows and other surfaces, turn them off as soon as you're done using them.

Here are some tips to help reduce moisture in crawlspaces:

  • Use a plastic covering on the dirt in your crawlspace. Doing so will prevent moisture from saturating the ground.
  • Ensure that your crawlspace or basement is ventilated well.
  • Check your home's gutters. Make sure they're directing water away from your property, not toward your foundation or crawlspace.

Your Top Choice for

Mold Toxicity Treatment in Lincolnia, VA

Trying to "tough it out" through life with CIRS isn't any way to live. If you're suffering from the effects of biotoxin illness, you should know that there are solutions available to help you reclaim your health and your life. With the help of a can-do attitude, healthy living, and mold illness treatment from Proactive Wellness, there's light at the end of the dark tunnel you're trapped within. Contact our office today to get started on your first step toward recovery!

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Latest News in Lincolnia, VA

Fireworks Near Me: Old Town Alexandria July 4th Events 2023

Patch has your guide to Independence Day fireworks shows, parades and other celebrations around Old Town Alexandria.ALEXANDRIA, VA — Alexandria's birthday fireworks will come days after the Fourth of July, but there are other fireworks and festivities to check out during the days before around Old Town Alexandria.We gathered up all the fireworks shows, parades and festivals happening in and around Old Town Alexandria for July 4 and beyond.Here's what's in store this July 4 in and around Old Town Alexandria:...

Patch has your guide to Independence Day fireworks shows, parades and other celebrations around Old Town Alexandria.

ALEXANDRIA, VA — Alexandria's birthday fireworks will come days after the Fourth of July, but there are other fireworks and festivities to check out during the days before around Old Town Alexandria.

We gathered up all the fireworks shows, parades and festivals happening in and around Old Town Alexandria for July 4 and beyond.

Here's what's in store this July 4 in and around Old Town Alexandria:

Alexandria 274th/USA 247th Birthday Celebration and Fireworks

When: Saturday, July 8, 8:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., rain date Sunday, July 9

Find out what's happening in Old Town Alexandriawith free, real-time updates from Patch.

Where: Oronoco Bay Park, 100 Madison St., Alexandria, VA

The Alexandria/USA Birthday Celebration will feature fireworks, live music, food and more. The fireworks display is expected to begin around 9:30 p.m.

The schedule is:

Fireworks will be viewable at Canal Center Plaza (Center Canal Plaza) , Rivergate Park (2 Montgomery St.), Oronoco Bay Park (100 Madison St.), Founders Park (351 North Union St.), Waterfront Park (1A Prince St.), Point Lumley Park, (1 Duke St.), Windmill Hill Park (501 South Union St.), Fords Landing boardwalk (99 Franklin St.), Jones Point Park (Jones Point Drive) and George Washington Masonic Temple (101 Callahan Drive).

An American Celebration at Mount Vernon

When: July 4, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Where: George Washington's Mount Vernon, 3200 Mount Vernon Memorial Hwy., Mount Vernon, VA

On the Fourth of July, enjoy daytime fireworks, observe a naturalization ceremony with people around the world becoming U.S. citizens, watch a performance by the National Concert Band, learn the 18th-century baking process with Resident Baker Justin Cherry of Half Crown Bakehouse, sample fresh bread, see 18th-century magic in the upper garden with Mr. Peter Gardiner and more.

Washington, DC Fourth of July Celebration

When: July 4

Where: Around National Mall, Washington, DC

There will be various events for Fourth of July in DC, including the National Independence Day Parade from 11:45 a.m. to 2 p.m. along Constitution Avenue NW from 7th Street NW to 17th Street NW with marching bands, fife and drum corps, floats, military units, giant balloons, equestrian, drill teams and more. A Capitol Fourth Concert is a free event held on the West Lawn of the United States Capitol at 8 p.m. and will be livestreamed. Fireworks will be held starting at 9:09 p.m., launched from both sides of the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool.

4th of July Celebration & Fireworks at the Military Women's Memorial

When: July 4, 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Where: Military Women's Memorial, Memorial Ave and Schley Dr., Arlington, VA

The Military Women's Memorial will host families for views of DC's fireworks. Attendees will enjoy a catered buffet, open bars, live music, family-friendly movies and popcorn, activities for all ages, photo booth, games and glowsticks.

City of Fairfax Independence Day Parade

When: Tuesday, July 4 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Where: Downtown Fairfax, VA

The Independence Day Parade has been a tradition since 1967 and is the largest in Virginia. Parade participants include marching bands, floats, Shriners' little cars and big motorcycles, old fire engines, clowns and more. The parade is typically followed by an Old-Fashioned Fireman's Day with children's fire safety activities. Parade food vendors will also be on site.

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More from Old Town Alexandria

Longtime Mason District Supervisor Penny Gross will retire, opting out of next election

Longtime Mason District Supervisor Penny Gross will not run for reelection next year.The 27-year Board of Supervisors veteran announced this morning that she will officially retire when her term is up on Dec. 31, 2023, meaning Gross will remain in office for another full year.“This was a difficult decision, but it’s the right time,” Gross said. “…There’s still a year left. I will be here and continuing to do the same things I’ve been doing the last 27 years, but it is time.”...

Longtime Mason District Supervisor Penny Gross will not run for reelection next year.

The 27-year Board of Supervisors veteran announced this morning that she will officially retire when her term is up on Dec. 31, 2023, meaning Gross will remain in office for another full year.

“This was a difficult decision, but it’s the right time,” Gross said. “…There’s still a year left. I will be here and continuing to do the same things I’ve been doing the last 27 years, but it is time.”

Gross told FFXnow last week that she would announce her plans for the 2023 elections one way or another this month.

First elected in 1995 to represent the Mason District, which encompasses Annandale, Seven Corners, Bailey’s Crossroads, and Lincolnia down to I-95 in Springfield, Gross won her seventh and final term in 2019 with nearly 64% of the vote.

She’s been a long-time advocate of expanding public transportation, affordable housing, and diversity in the county.

Even back in 1999, when she was running for her first reelection bid, she defended the increasing diversity and changing demographics in Fairfax County.

“I am troubled by the amount of animosity by some in the community about ‘those people,'” Gross told The Washington Post 23 years ago. “One of the things I hear at civic association meetings is a concern that folks who are moving in don’t have the same appreciation as those who are moving out. I’m not sure that’s the case.”

Gross has also served as the vice chairman of the board since 2009.

Early in her career, she worked on the staff of Idaho Sen. Frank Church, who very nearly won the Democratic presidential nomination in 1976.

Board Chair Jeff McKay praised Gross for being a “leader” and leaving a lasting legacy.

I know that you’ve thought about this long and hard. You’ve been an outstanding and continue to be an outstanding vice chair to me as chairman and leader for the county, and as I said, there will be a lot of time for us to reflect on this in the months ahead, but I think the simplest thing to do today is just to share with you how grateful I am for everything you’ve done for the county and for the residents of Mason District and how proud I am of the legacy that you’ve built for others and the leadership attributes that you brought to the table in an always reasonable, well-organized, respectful, well-thought-out way, and so, very, very grateful for that.

Gross got a bit emotional when announcing her decision to retire, particularly after McKay’s comments.

“I practiced this in front of a mirror, and I wasn’t going to cry. I wasn’t going to get emotional. At some point, you get emotional,” she said.

Gross isn’t the only long-time supervisor to announce they won’t be seeking re-election in 2023. This past summer, Dranesville District Supervisor John Foust said he would be stepping down at the end of his term as well.

Gross’s full announcement of her retirement is below.

When I first moved to the National Capital Region, The Byrds had a hit recording that emulated Ecclesiastes – To Everything There Is a Season (popularly known as Turn Turn Turn). To a young Hill staffer, the song was more a peace anthem than a life plan but, over time, I have come to learn, and accept that, indeed, there is a season and a “time for every purpose under heaven.” Some of the times noted in the song are especially appropriate for those who are privileged to be elected officials — a time to plant and a time to reap, a time to build up, a time to speak, and, sometimes, a time to keep silent.

In our positions as elected officials, we have additional seasons that require our attention and participation — snow season, budget season, campaign season, for example. Mindful that the campaign season is nearly upon us, I am announcing today that I will not seek reelection in 2023 and I’ll retire when this term is completed on December 31, 2023. There is lots more to do, but there will always be lots more to do. I love my job. I appreciate and respect my colleagues and treasure all of Mason District and the residents who have placed their trust and confidence in me for the past 27 years. During the next year plus, my staff and I will endeavor to provide the same robust constituent services as we have done for nearly three decades. We’re so fortunate to be in Fairfax County, an outstanding place to live, work, play, worship and learn. I’m proud and grateful to have played a role in ensuring these opportunities for our diverse community, and I look forward to the continuing success of Fairfax County and the region.

Angela Woolsey contributed to this report.

A quiet, rural Lincolnia is remembered by a long-time resident

Few Lincolnia residents know what their community was like when it was still a rural enclave, before it became choked with strip malls, subdivisions, and traffic.Third-generation Lincolnia resident Jill Gerald, 79, remembers. At a presentation on Lincolnia in the Olden Days at the Mason Government Center in August, Gerald spoke about the old farms, country stores, and her family’s roots long before Shirley Highway was built. ...

Few Lincolnia residents know what their community was like when it was still a rural enclave, before it became choked with strip malls, subdivisions, and traffic.

Third-generation Lincolnia resident Jill Gerald, 79, remembers. At a presentation on Lincolnia in the Olden Days at the Mason Government Center in August, Gerald spoke about the old farms, country stores, and her family’s roots long before Shirley Highway was built.

Her father was born in Lincolnia in 1885. Her mother moved across the road in 1900 when she was 2 years old.

They went to a one-room schoolhouse near what is now the intersection of Interstate 395 and Route 236. The school only covered five years, and the older kids taught the younger ones.

Gerald and her twin brother were the youngest of nine children – the four oldest ones were born at home.

Her parents bought their house in 1924, and Jill lived on that property for 77 years and now lives nearby.

Gerald’s mother’s cousin worked at a chicken hatchery where Landmark Plaza is now. “The women’s job there was de-beaking the baby chicks so they wouldn’t hurt each other,” she says.

She remembers going to Howard’s Store on Columbia Pike, across from the Discount Zone gas station, where local farmers bought feed and straw. The building had a lunch counter, tables and chairs, gas pumps out front, and the owners’ living quarters in the rear. The store was owned by Jill’s uncle Harry. He had one of the first TVs in the area, and a crowd gathered there to watch boxing and wrestling matches.

Gerald attended Lincolnia Elementary School on N. Chambliss Street. Part of that building was preserved when Lincolnia Senior Center was built on that site.

Each student was given a vitamin at lunch, she recalls. As a clinic aid in the seventh grade, she was responsible for making sure the cot had clean sheets and cleaning up the blood after accidents, such as the time a globe fell on a girl’s head.

Schools and churches had a close relationship back in the day, she says. The church didn’t have running water so it held dinners at the school and church softball teams used the school field.

A little white church on Lincolnia Road near the post office was torn down when Shirley Highway was built in the early 1950s, and Gerald remembers that when the congregation moved to a new building, church members carried everything – the pews, Bible, cross, communion items – as they walked to their new home.

The area between Columbia Pike and Braddock Road was originally settled by former slaves and had stayed a predominantly black community for decades, as “everything was segregated back then,” Gerald notes.

That community had its own school and small white church, which had been expanded over the years and is now the large, brick Mount Pleasant Baptist Church on the corner of Lincolnia Road and Columbia Pike. A historic marker was installed there a year ago.

When Gerald was in school, black students were bused to a segregated high school in Manassas, and later were sent to the all-black Luther Jackson High School, which is now a middle school.

“Segregation ended in 1962 but everybody didn’t comply with it right away,” she says.

Twins Jack and Jill (the future Jill Gerald) feed the family chickens.

Gerald remembers the Dowden family, who lived in an old house on Fairfax Parkway where what is now the Parklawn community. Sarah Foster Dowden attended the one-room school and helped teach the younger children. Later, they built a brick house across from the dam on Columbia Pike. Mr. Dowden was a justice of the peace in Groveton and also gave dogs rabies shots.

The Clark House, which is now owned by the Fairfax County Park Authority and was rotated to its current position overlooking Barcroft Plaza, used to be Clark family’s farmhouse. The Clarks owned a large dairy farm where Parklawn is now.

There was no trash pickup when Gerald was a child. People burned their trash and kids played in the garbage dump in a small area in the future Parklawn community. The rest of that area was a field with cows.

A worker at the chicken farm.

There used to be a chapel and social hall on the site of the cemetery near the senior center, and students from the Episcopal seminary used to walk there to preach. Gerald’s parents, grandparents, husband, and son are buried there.

Several years ago, there was a plan for townhouses on that property, but Fairfax County purchased the land in 2012 for use as a burial ground for indigents.

Lincolnia was originally known as Lebanon, Gerald says. The residents wanted to rename it for President Lincoln, but there already was a town in Virginia called Lincoln, so they settled on Lincolnia.

Gerald went to Fairfax High School for the eighth and ninth grades, then transferred to Annandale High School when it opened in 1955. An older sister graduated from Mount Vernon High School; two others went to Fairfax High School. One of her older brothers worked at the Torpedo Factory in Alexandria when it produced torpedoes for World War II.

Jill Gerald (right) and her daughter Debi Gerald.

Gerald recalls shopping at Landmark Plaza when there was a Grand Union grocery store (where Total Wine is now), an S. Klein department store, Sterling Hardware, and a greeting-card store called Magellan’s.

Landmark Plaza will be evolving again soon, when Giant opens in the space formerly occupied by Shopper’s. The new Giant is expected to open before Thanksgiving. Hobby Lobby is expected to open in the upper level in spring 2019.

More comprehensive changes are coming to Lincolnia. A task force is drafting recommendations for amending the comprehensive plan to allow for more density, more coordinated development, and transportation improvements.

Door To Door: Lincolnia Hills, Va. And Kent, D.C.

Kathy Hoekstra standing in front of her home in the Lincolnia Hills neighborhood of Alexandria Va.John HinesIt’s our weekly trip around the region. This time, we’ll visit Lincolnia Hills in Alexandria, Va., and the Kent neighborhood of Northwest D.C.Lincolnia Hills, Va.Kathy Hoekstra lives in northern Virginia, just west of Interstate 395. And she says that her neighborhood of Lincolnia Hills in Alexandria has remained immune to urbanization, even though it’s still located inside...

Kathy Hoekstra standing in front of her home in the Lincolnia Hills neighborhood of Alexandria Va.

John Hines

It’s our weekly trip around the region. This time, we’ll visit Lincolnia Hills in Alexandria, Va., and the Kent neighborhood of Northwest D.C.

Lincolnia Hills, Va.

Kathy Hoekstra lives in northern Virginia, just west of Interstate 395. And she says that her neighborhood of Lincolnia Hills in Alexandria has remained immune to urbanization, even though it’s still located inside the Beltway. “It’s all basically single family homes, so we have no apartments or commercial buildings.”

Hoekstra says that government employees built up Lincolnia HIlls in the mid-50s. “But obviously, some of those people have passed on, and their homes have been bought by new families coming in,” she says. “So we have Hispanics and African Americans and a whole group of everybody else across the spectrum. So federal workers, white collar workers, blue collar workers, it’s a very mixed group, which is wonderful.”

According to Hoekstra, Lincolnia Hills has a mixed group of wildlife as well. “We also have a stream that flows down in this area. We have deer and raccoon and foxes, and a lot of wildlife, which I don’t think too many people expect within the Beltway, but we have a lot of them.”

Hoekstra believes that Lincolnia Hills is a unique neighborhood in the Washington area. “It’s a wonderful neighborhood, and it’s a very peaceful, quiet neighborhood inside the Beltway, which I think is somewhat unusual.”

Kent, D.C.

Connie Carter lives in the Kent neighborhood of northwest D.C., a community located near the Potomac River.

While Kent primarily saw development in the 1930s, Carter says the neighborhood today is an eclectic one. “The architecture itself is a mishmash, and so I think it attracts a variety of people,” she says. “The key elementary school is located in Kent on Dana Place down near MacArthur, so there are a large number of families and small children as well.”

According to Carter, Kent isn’t just eclectic. It’s historical. “Chain Bridge Road is not only the oldest or second oldest street in Washington, D.C., but is by far the oldest street in Kent,” she says.

Chain Bridge Road allowed trucks to go down to the canal and cut through the woods. “I believe there was a railroad or a streetcar at the bottom of the hill, so it was a pretty significant bypass road.”

Carter says that Kent’s location is a major perk. “You can live in northwest Washington and still be in Bethesda, out at Tyson’s Corner and at Reagan Airport and Georgetown all within 15 or 10 minutes. So it’s highly convenient.”

[Music: “No, Girl” by John Davis from Title Tracks]

Explore previously featured neighborhoods on our Door to Door map:

This map shows previous Door to Door segments, and includes links to photos and show audio. The yellow marker represents neighborhoods featured in Washington, D.C., the blue represents neighborhoods in Maryland, and the red represents neighborhoods in Virginia.

Investigation finds 'systemic gaps' in FCPS hiring after counselor convicted of sex crimes allowed to continue working

Darren Thornton worked as a middle school counselor in Fairfax County despite a conviction for sex crimes against children.LINCOLNIA, Va. — Tuesday, former Fairfax County Public Schools counselor Darren Thornton was in a Chesterfield County, Virginia courtroom on charges of soliciting prostitution, the allegations that ...

Darren Thornton worked as a middle school counselor in Fairfax County despite a conviction for sex crimes against children.

LINCOLNIA, Va. — Tuesday, former Fairfax County Public Schools counselor Darren Thornton was in a Chesterfield County, Virginia courtroom on charges of soliciting prostitution, the allegations that got him fired this past summer from his job at Glasgow Middle School.

By law he should have been fired nearly two years ago when he was first charged and eventually convicted of sex crimes against children.

For that, Thornton was placed on probation. He had already passed a background check to get hired with Fairfax County Public Schools and kept working despite his conviction.

"We need to understand what happened here and why it happened," said Kathleen Brown, a FCPS parent at a Tuesday night meeting at Glasgow Middle.

At the meeting, the FCPS superintendent Dr. Michelle Reid shared with parents the results of an independent investigation into Thornton's employment.

The report found the district was never notified of Thornton's original arrest or conviction.

And also found "several systemic gaps" in the FCPS hiring process "including on reference checks, verification of the appropriate license, and information sharing between jurisdictions" among other issues the superintendent says FCPS is addressing as quickly as possible.

"One of the things that we have to do first is name that we have a concern, acknowledge that, look into it, and then follow recommendations that we know to be best practice moving forward," Dr. Reid told WUSA9. "I don't believe it's going to happen again here in Fairfax County Public Schools. And, I believe our families can trust us."

"I really think Dr. Reid is on the right path here. But I think we have to persist," said Brown echoing the concerns of some other parents at the meeting.

"To blithely say, 'No, this is not happening, it's not going to happen again here,' is very naïve," said Brown. "We have got to realize we've got all sorts of concerns about our kids and I think they're valid concerns."

One change Dr. Reid said she wants is regular background checks of current staff, after they are hired. But, she says she needs the commonwealth's help to make that feasible by enrolling in a FBI program called Rap Back.

The superintendent also says she has already taken disciplinary action on school employees and more could be coming but she won't say who or what it was.

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