Fight Back Against Mold Illness with Help from Proactive Wellness Centers

CIRS Mold Toxicity Treatment in Tysons, VA

Experiencing mold toxicity is a terrifying thought for most people. Although it may seem like an interesting concept for a medical drama, nobody wants to experience the effects of mold exposure firsthand.

Mold is a fungus that thrives in wet environments, such as under tiles, wood floors, and ceilings, pipes, and roofs. While several types of mold exist, some are more hazardous than others, and some individuals may be allergic or sensitive to mycotoxins, the toxins that mold naturally produces. Exposure to excessive amounts of mold, or the types of mold that trigger health problems, can lead to mold toxicity and even CIRS - Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome. This acute and chronic systemic inflammatory response syndrome is typically acquired after exposure to mold or other producers of biotoxins, usually from damaged water buildings.

If you believe that you're suffering from mold toxicity or mold illness, it can seem like the world is folding in on you. No matter what you do, your symptoms persist, lowering your quality of life and eliminating your peace of mind. Fortunately, there is reason to be hopeful: Proactive Wellness Centers now offers a research-backed, highly effective mold illness poisoning treatment in Tysons, VA for men and women just like yourself and your children as well if they have been impacted.

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Understanding

CIRS and Mold Toxicity

CIRS and mold illness are on the rise, and accurate diagnosis of the issue plays a major role in this trend. Thanks to Dr. Ritchie Shoemaker, there is a huge body of evidence that covers diagnosing and treating patients with CIRS. Dr. Lawson is one of less than 30 practitioners in the United States that are fully certified by Dr. Shoemaker for diagnosing and treating CIRS. The body of evidence by Shoemaker and many associates is the largest body of scientific evidence that is published in major medical journals. Around 80% of CIRS/Mold cases are caused by indoor air contaminated with mold toxins and other triggers. However, it's important to note that CIRS can also be caused by biotoxin producers such as cyanobacteria and a marine dinoflagellate that produces the Ciguatera toxin found in certain types of fish.

When mold or biotoxins are not processed effectively, a series of biochemical changes known as the Biotoxin Pathway occur. Genetic studies have revealed that approximately 24% of individuals have a genetic makeup that makes them susceptible to developing an illness related to mold or biotoxins. The remaining 76% of the population can typically eliminate these toxins from their system and avoid the development of the Biotoxin Pathway that can lead to various diseases.

CIRS Treatment In Tysons Tysons, VA

CIRS and Mold Poisoning Misdiagnosis

CIRS and mold exposure symptoms overlap with many other chronic illnesses, which makes diagnosis challenging and can even lead to missed diagnosis of CIRS. Based on research from Proactive Wellness Centers, CIRS is frequently misdiagnosed. Some of the most common misdiagnoses include:

  • Lupus
  • Chronic Pain Syndrome
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Parkinson's Disease
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
  • PTSD
  • More

Lyme disease, in particular, is often misdiagnosed. We have treated a number of patients whose symptoms were in line with Lyme disease. Fortunately, we were able to confirm the presence of CIRS and mold and were able to successfully help those patients using CIRS treatment in Tysons, VA.

Note that many of these patients have CIRS and Lyme disease and in that case, it is necessary to treat both in order for full recovery. Treating one or the other will invariably leave the patient with debilitating symptoms and even more frustration with their medical team. At Proactive Wellness Centers, we are skilled In diagnosing and treating both.

 VA Tysons, VA
 CIRS Mold Toxicity Treatment In Tysons Tysons, VA

CIRS and Mold Poisoning Symptoms

If you're reading this page, chances are you're concerned that you might have CIRS or some form of mold poisoning. You may be wondering what you have - is it CIRS, or is it something else like Lyme disease? We can't provide the answer to that question without consultation and testing at our wellness center in Virginia. However, there are common symptoms of CIRS and mold toxicity you should know.

Some of the most common symptoms of CIRS include:

  • Fatigue
  • Decreased Word Finding
  • Headaches
  • Difficulty Concentrating
  • Morning Stiffness
  • Tremors
  • Excessive Thirst
  • Tingling
  • Night Sweats
  • Frequent Urination
  • Confusion
  • Mood Swings

Proactive Wellness Centers'

Tools for Diagnosing Mold Sickness and CIRS

Identifying and confirming if a patient is being impacted by CIRS and identifying the cause and source of the biotoxin are the two main steps in diagnosing CIRS and Mold Exposure. To diagnose CIRS and Mold Exposure, the following diagnostic tools are commonly used:

To learn more about the debilitating symptoms of mold sickness and to find out whether you have CIRS or something else, contact Proactive Wellness Centers. Our team of medical professionals is here to help you every step of the way.

 VA Tysons, VA

Hope for Patients with CIRS: Proactive Wellness Centers' Mold Illness Treatment in Tysons, VA

Our approach to treating CIRS utilizes integrative and functional medicine, The Shoemaker Protocol along with the latest evidence-based approaches to treating mold illness and the related secondary issues that it causes. We begin by utilizing advanced diagnostics to confirm the presence of the condition and identify the specific environment causing continued exposure to biotoxins. Next, we take a stepwise approach to halt the progression of the disease, eliminate biotoxins from the body, and reverse any damage to cellular structures. Our goal is to help patients achieve a full recovery.

To do this, we not only have to identify the primary condition like CIRS or Lyme disease, but we then have to continue looking to see if you have any of the common secondary conditions like reactivated EBV, Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS), and others. Once we understand the totally of your condition, then we can implement a treatment plan tailored for you. Yes, it will leverage the Shoemaker protocol, but we have found that we have to extend the protocol to cover the secondary issues that we uncover.

The steps we follow to reach that goal include:

In order to initiate the recovery process, it is important to address and resolve any affected areas, or, alternatively, relocate the patient from that environment if necessary. Prolonged exposure to mold can hinder the success of the treatment plan and impede the healing process.

Two commonly used binding agents in the process of treating Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome are Welchol and Cholestyramine. Cholestyramine is particularly effective in binding biotoxins that are processed in the liver's bile ducts and helps to eliminate them from the body. It has been scientifically proven, through placebo-controlled studies, to reverse multiple aspects of the inflammatory process associated with CIRS.

Many individuals experiencing mold sickness and other chronic inflammatory illnesses may have a staph infection called MARCoNS (Multiple Antibiotic Resistant Coagulase Negative Staphylococci) residing deep in their nasal cavities. This infection is resistant to antibiotics and needs to be eliminated for the patient to fully recover.

Each patient requires a customized plan based on the affected areas and CIRS severity. Retesting is necessary after each step to confirm balance restoration. Testing may include some or all of the following:
  • VIP
  • TGF Beta 1
  • MMP9
  • ADH
  • Antigliadin
  • Androgen Imbalance
  • C4a
  • More

In order to halt the growth of mold fungi, patients need to avoid foods that can cause mycotoxins. Some examples of these foods include:
  • Barley
  • Cottonseed
  • Peanuts
  • Corn
  • Black Pepper
  • Figs
  • Rice
  • Bread
  • Beans
  • More
Proactive Wellness has a proven track record of treating patients who have experienced severe health issues without any clear explanation. Unlike other "syndromes," our diagnosis process involves specific tests to confirm a diagnosis rather than simply ruling out other diseases.
 CIRS Mold Poisoning Treatment In Tysons Tysons, VA

Fibromyalgia, Lupus, Chronic Fatigue, and Chronic Pain Syndrome are examples of illnesses that are often diagnosed without such confirmatory tests. If you are experiencing unexplained health issues or have been exposed to water-damaged buildings, it is possible that you are suffering from CIRS or a mold illness.

The good news is that we can diagnose and address this disease with a mold illness treatment program in Tysons, VA tailored to your body and your symptoms. That way, we can help you regain your health as soon as possible.

Be Wary of These

5 Symptoms of Mold Exposure

Mold spores can easily be brought into your home on your shoes or clothing or through open windows or doors. If these spores can find a warm, damp, humid environment, they can begin to multiply. Soon, your home can be filled with toxic mold. If you think mold has invaded your home or another environment, like in an office or warehouse, it's important for you to know about the symptoms.

Unfortunately, diagnosing mold issues can be exceptionally difficult. But why? The answer can be quite frustrating.

Understanding the Difficulty of Diagnosing Mold Symptoms

Many doctors fail to recognize the impact of mycotoxins emitted by certain indoor mold species, which can lead to chemical and inflammatory reactions. While conventional medicine acknowledges that mold can cause allergies, it may overlook this crucial aspect of mold-related health issues.

This can happen for several reasons:

  • Standardized treatment protocols for mold toxicity are offered mostly by Functional/Integrative physicians as the conventional physicians are not on board despite over 20 years of published research. Due to this issue, patients spend precious months/years going from doctor to doctor in the conventional channel with no answers.
  • Though ERMI testing has been accepted in the integrative/functional medical community, there isn't a "gold standard" in mold testing that is universally accepted.
  • Mold symptoms can manifest in vastly different ways depending on the patient.
VA Tysons, VA

After understanding the points above, it's no wonder that mold poisoning can be hard to diagnose. Fortunately, integrative and functional holistic medicine providers and wellness centers like Proactive Wellness are flipping the proverbial script. Unlike traditional clinics, our team considers environmental factors that can affect patient health and has advanced training to provide mold poisoning treatment in Tysons, VA.

Now that you understand why mold symptoms are so hard to diagnose let's take a closer look at five of the most common indicators of mold sickness.

 Mold Toxicity Symptoms Tysons, VA

Fatigue

Fatigue is probably the number one symptom of well over 90% of CIRS patients. The level of fatigue varies from 5 on a 10 point scale all the way to 10 on a 10 point scale. Many patients can no longer work or remain productive as in the worst cases, the fatigue is overwhelming. College students living in moldy dorms frequently have to drop out of school until the illness is treated effectively. Older adults have to retire or stop working due the fatigue. If you have overwhelming fatigue, CIRS may be a major contributor to your illness.

 Mold Poisoning Symtoms Tysons, VA

Breathing Problems

Exposure to mold can cause a host of respiratory problems, such as breathing difficulties, allergies, and asthma, especially in individuals with a weakened immune system. Mold can worsen asthma, irritate the nasal passages, lungs, and throat, and lead to symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, sneezing, sore throat, and nasal congestion. Other health issues such as hypersensitivity pneumonitis, sinus congestion, allergic rhinitis, asthma, and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis have also been associated with mold sickness.

 Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Treatment Tysons, VA

Sadness and Depression

Mold can cause a variety of illnesses that can show up in different ways, such as psychological symptoms like anxiety, depression, insomnia, concentration problems, and memory loss. It has been reported that nearly 40% of people who live in moldy homes experience depression. Researchers suggest that exposure to toxic mold and dealing with the physical symptoms of mold illness can contribute to mental health issues.

Due to this phenomenon, many mold patients are given antidepressant medications in the conventional channels.

 Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Symptoms Tysons, VA

Feeling "Pins and Needles"

Numbness, twitching, or tingling in the extremities, such as hands, feet, legs, and arms, is another symptom of mold illness. The sensation is similar to pins and needles, which are often felt when the body is held in an uncomfortable position for a long time. While this sensation can indicate serious nerve damage or disease, it can also be a symptom of mold sickness.

CIRS Treatment In Tysons Tysons, VA

Digestion Problems and Disorders

When exposed to mold, individuals may experience various digestive problems. Some may lose their appetite, leading to unintentional weight loss. Others may suffer from stomach pain, nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting. Furthermore, the influx of mold spores may trigger systemic inflammation, causing bloating and weight gain due to the digestive system's exposure to harmful mold.

Top Tips for

Controlling Mold in Your Environment

It's not possible to completely eliminate all mold and mold spores from your home or place of work. However, since mold spores need moisture to grow, the best way to prevent or get rid of growth is to reduce the moisture in your environment. If you already have mold growing there, it's important to clean it up and address the issue causing dampness. If you only clean up the mold and don't address the underlying problem, the mold is likely to return.

Here are some tips to help reduce moisture throughout your home or office:

  • Use A/C or Dehumidifiers. This is especially important if you live in a hot, humid area of the United States.
  • Ensure A/C drip pans are clean, dry, and obstruction-free.
  • Thoroughly dry areas that are damp or wet within 48 hours.
  • Be sure to install insulation in cold areas like your home's exterior walls and windows. Doing so will reduce condensation.
  • Work with an HVAC company to check your HVAC system. Doing so can help ensure your unit is removing as much humidity as possible.
  • Keep the humidity in your home below 60% whenever possible.
 CIRS Mold Toxicity Treatment In Tysons Tysons, VA
 VA Tysons, VA

Here are some tips to help reduce moisture in your kitchen:

  • Check for leaks near your ice makers, sinks, and anywhere else water is present.
  • Make sure your exhaust fans are directing moisture outside, not into your attic.
  • If you notice your appliances are causing moisture on windows and other surfaces, turn them off as soon as you're done using them.

Here are some tips to help reduce moisture in crawlspaces:

  • Use a plastic covering on the dirt in your crawlspace. Doing so will prevent moisture from saturating the ground.
  • Ensure that your crawlspace or basement is ventilated well.
  • Check your home's gutters. Make sure they're directing water away from your property, not toward your foundation or crawlspace.

Your Top Choice for

Mold Toxicity Treatment in Tysons, VA

Trying to "tough it out" through life with CIRS isn't any way to live. If you're suffering from the effects of biotoxin illness, you should know that there are solutions available to help you reclaim your health and your life. With the help of a can-do attitude, healthy living, and mold illness treatment from Proactive Wellness, there's light at the end of the dark tunnel you're trapped within. Contact our office today to get started on your first step toward recovery!

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Latest News in Tysons, VA

Where to Eat Around Tysons Corner

Tysons Corner is known primarily for three things: its massive pair of malls, the large number of companies headquartered there, and the resulting terrible traffic that results from all of these things colliding at once. A day of hitting the shops or braving the commute is sure to work up an appetite or a thirst, and Tysons Corner has options for nearly every price point and cuisine.Beyond those standouts highlighted here, the number of quick-service and chain options in the area continues to be substantial, from Virginia’s orig...

Tysons Corner is known primarily for three things: its massive pair of malls, the large number of companies headquartered there, and the resulting terrible traffic that results from all of these things colliding at once. A day of hitting the shops or braving the commute is sure to work up an appetite or a thirst, and Tysons Corner has options for nearly every price point and cuisine.

Beyond those standouts highlighted here, the number of quick-service and chain options in the area continues to be substantial, from Virginia’s original Shake Shack location to an outpost of area favorite Lebanese Taverna. Starting this holiday season, shoppers can even stroll the mall with an adult beverage in hand.

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Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

Zentan veteran Yo Matsuzaki is behind this fusion izakaya in the hotel attached to Capitol One’s headquarters. There’s a generous raw bar and dishes like scallops with bacon enoki and yuzu vinaigrette.

This Virginia brewery has made a splash in Tysons with its rooftop beer garden atop the Capitol Hill building, which includes 24 tap lines.

One of the area’s best food trucks has a standalone location to serve up lamb, chicken kebabs, stewed chickpeas, and more.

The revolving sushi bar out of Japan debuted its first Virginia outpost this summer with a steady stream of $3.30 plates. A whopping 140 items circulate on a conveyor belt at any given time, from rolls to noodle soups to a variety of hot and cold side dishes.

Though the Urban Space food hall that originally housed it is no more, this excellent purveyor of pizza by the slice (as well as robust whole pies) lives on in Tysons II.

This international chain out of Hokkaido made its D.C.-area debut with this Tysons location. Expect traditional varieties of ramen, like shio and shoyu, prepared with thin, springy noodles. A small collection of appetizers rounds out the menu. The restaurant is frequently busy, and does a robust takeout business.

A relatively new addition to the area for dim sum, Han Palace also has cocktails and a small patio. Look for items like shrimp toast, stuffed duck, lobster sticky fried rice, and more. Order online here.

This bistro in the Ritz Carlton in Tysons draws menu inspiration from a variety of countries including Italy, Singapore, Thailand, Toronto, and St. Thomas. Options include everything from biryani to katsu sando riffs to lobster pastas.

Shipping containers give shape to this food and beer pop-up with almost an outdoor food hall quality to it, complete with firepits for keeping warm during winter months. The idea is an evolution of Tysons Biergarten and now includes dining from vendors serving waffles and tacos, fast-casual Persian, and sushi burritos (and even sushi pizza).

The Peruvian-style rotisserie chicken is the specialty at this counter service spot. A quarter, half or whole bird can be paired with simple sides including fried yucca, black beans, and salad.

Pho is obviously on the menu at this local chain, but there are also several traditional Vietnamese dishes, from shaking beef to shrimp-stuffed crepes.

Nostos is an underrated destination for contemporary Greek food. There’s a deep lineup of cheese dishes — think pan-fried, sesame-crusted feta served with honey and almonds. Seafood is a speciality, and mezze are plentiful.

This upscale Iranian restaurant comes from Maydan vet Chris Morgan and Persian chef and cookbook author Najmieh Batmanglij. Find luxurious kabobs, platters of duck and lamb shoulder, thadig and more. The Kitchen Collective is also using the space to hold pop-ups featuring upcoming restaurants during daytime hours.

This huge venue from Great American Restaurants has hits from all of its restaurants on the menu, from Sweetwater Tavern to Ozzie’s. Look for crab cakes, lobster rolls, a strong French dip, and more. The restaurant chain has a variety of option in Tysons, including Coastal Flats and new steakhouse, Randy’s Prime Seafood, that’s attached to Patsy’s.

Zentan veteran Yo Matsuzaki is behind this fusion izakaya in the hotel attached to Capitol One’s headquarters. There’s a generous raw bar and dishes like scallops with bacon enoki and yuzu vinaigrette.

This Virginia brewery has made a splash in Tysons with its rooftop beer garden atop the Capitol Hill building, which includes 24 tap lines.

One of the area’s best food trucks has a standalone location to serve up lamb, chicken kebabs, stewed chickpeas, and more.

The revolving sushi bar out of Japan debuted its first Virginia outpost this summer with a steady stream of $3.30 plates. A whopping 140 items circulate on a conveyor belt at any given time, from rolls to noodle soups to a variety of hot and cold side dishes.

Though the Urban Space food hall that originally housed it is no more, this excellent purveyor of pizza by the slice (as well as robust whole pies) lives on in Tysons II.

This international chain out of Hokkaido made its D.C.-area debut with this Tysons location. Expect traditional varieties of ramen, like shio and shoyu, prepared with thin, springy noodles. A small collection of appetizers rounds out the menu. The restaurant is frequently busy, and does a robust takeout business.

A relatively new addition to the area for dim sum, Han Palace also has cocktails and a small patio. Look for items like shrimp toast, stuffed duck, lobster sticky fried rice, and more. Order online here.

This bistro in the Ritz Carlton in Tysons draws menu inspiration from a variety of countries including Italy, Singapore, Thailand, Toronto, and St. Thomas. Options include everything from biryani to katsu sando riffs to lobster pastas.

Shipping containers give shape to this food and beer pop-up with almost an outdoor food hall quality to it, complete with firepits for keeping warm during winter months. The idea is an evolution of Tysons Biergarten and now includes dining from vendors serving waffles and tacos, fast-casual Persian, and sushi burritos (and even sushi pizza).

The Peruvian-style rotisserie chicken is the specialty at this counter service spot. A quarter, half or whole bird can be paired with simple sides including fried yucca, black beans, and salad.

Pho is obviously on the menu at this local chain, but there are also several traditional Vietnamese dishes, from shaking beef to shrimp-stuffed crepes.

Nostos is an underrated destination for contemporary Greek food. There’s a deep lineup of cheese dishes — think pan-fried, sesame-crusted feta served with honey and almonds. Seafood is a speciality, and mezze are plentiful.

This upscale Iranian restaurant comes from Maydan vet Chris Morgan and Persian chef and cookbook author Najmieh Batmanglij. Find luxurious kabobs, platters of duck and lamb shoulder, thadig and more. The Kitchen Collective is also using the space to hold pop-ups featuring upcoming restaurants during daytime hours.

This huge venue from Great American Restaurants has hits from all of its restaurants on the menu, from Sweetwater Tavern to Ozzie’s. Look for crab cakes, lobster rolls, a strong French dip, and more. The restaurant chain has a variety of option in Tysons, including Coastal Flats and new steakhouse, Randy’s Prime Seafood, that’s attached to Patsy’s.

Tysons' surburban-to-urban transformation still a work in progress

Tysons has been working to transform itself from a suburban retail center to a mixed-use, urban oasis for over a decade — but it still has a ways to go.Why it matters: Creating a walkable, transit-friendly, and mixed-use urban downtown isn't easy, especially in a place like Tysons, which sprung up around highways and despite improvements still lacks much of the draw of communities closer to D.C., like walkability, charm, arts and culture, and nightlife.The big picture: Tysons is already a...

Tysons has been working to transform itself from a suburban retail center to a mixed-use, urban oasis for over a decade — but it still has a ways to go.

Why it matters: Creating a walkable, transit-friendly, and mixed-use urban downtown isn't easy, especially in a place like Tysons, which sprung up around highways and despite improvements still lacks much of the draw of communities closer to D.C., like walkability, charm, arts and culture, and nightlife.

The big picture: Tysons is already a large economic bolster for Fairfax County. It sees over $2.4 billion in annual spending, accounting for 8% of the county's tax revenues despite comprising only 1% of its land, according to a recent Tysons Community Alliance (TCA) report.

Under its Comprehensive Plan, Tysons aims to transform the census-designated area into the kind of live-work-play environment seen at The Wharf, with the goal of housing 100,000 residents and 200,000 jobs by 2050.

What they're saying: Tysons is leading the example countrywide in suburbs-to-urban retrofitting, says Alex Iams, FCEDA's executive vice president.

Catch up fast: Tysons was largely farmland until the 1960s, when Dulles, Tysons Corner Center, and the Capital Beltway opened, corresponding with a period when much retail and residents (many of them white) left cities for the suburbs.

State of play: In the decade-plus since then, Tysons has seen a swath of development — today it's home to Fortune 500 companies like Booz Allen, Hilton, and Capital One, the latter of which recently built a sprawling campus complete with a performance hall, a Skypark, hotel, and baseball stadium.

By the numbers: According to TCA's recent survey, Tysons is making strides in some of its 2050 goals.

Meanwhile, residential development is racing to keep up.

Tysons also continues to bet big on the "work" part of the equation, even amid post-Covid office uncertainty:

Reality check: TCA's study also found Tysons has much to accomplish concerning transit, biking, and walking — likely not shocking to anyone who's recently tried to go carless there.

Zoom in: When it comes to walkability, Tysons ranks "somewhat walkable" — better than nearby Reston and Bethesda, but lower than Crystal City.

Yes, but: Its bike score is lacking, worse than Reston, Bethesda, and Crystal City. This is partly thanks to busy roads like routes 123 and 7 and a lack of safe ways to cross them.

The bottom line: Tysons' residential addresses are still more likely to be located in less walkable and bikeable areas farther away from transit options, the study found.

What we're watching: Fairfax has allocated $25 million toward biker and pedestrian updates, part of its $100 million commitment to improving pedestrian safety over the next six years. A new pedestrian/bike bridge was recently built over the Beltway.

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New Report Shows Tysons is Evolving to More Than a Place to Shop and Work

While shopping is still a draw, the community is now a place where more people are coming to live.Years ago, Tysons had a reputation as the place where you went to the mall or to work. Now, a market study shows it’s evolving into a more balanced live-work community.Household growth tripled over the past three years compared with the preceding three years, helping Tysons recover from the pandemic, the 166-page Tysons Market Study finds. ...

While shopping is still a draw, the community is now a place where more people are coming to live.

Years ago, Tysons had a reputation as the place where you went to the mall or to work. Now, a market study shows it’s evolving into a more balanced live-work community.

Household growth tripled over the past three years compared with the preceding three years, helping Tysons recover from the pandemic, the 166-page Tysons Market Study finds. The population grew by 17 percent between 2015 and 2021 to more than 29,000. And it’s projected Tysons will be home to 43,000 people by 2030.

“Available housing units are projected to grow by over 82 percent in the next 10 years. This is substantially higher than the [Fairfax] county rate of 25 percent,” according to the report, commissioned by the Tysons Community Alliance.

“The extent to which Tysons has truly, dramatically, outpaced growth, not only within our region, but among our national peers, is really striking. … It feels like transformation is happening in Tysons,” says Katie Cristol, CEO of the alliance.

In terms of economic impact, taxes from Tysons add up to $268 million and account for 8 percent of what Fairfax County takes in, yet Tysons sits on 1 percent of the county’s land.

“Tysons is punching above its weight, I guess I would say, when you look at the tax revenue that it brings to the county relative to our relatively small share of the land value,” Cristol says. “There is a great deal that Tysons has to offer in that regard.”

Surveys underway are asking people what they want and need related to transportation, parks, retail, residential, hospitality, and work. Cristol says one overarching idea coming into view is that Tysons “is a community in and of itself. … This is not just a place that you come in to work 9 to 5, but it is a place that you want to stay because your running club meets in the afternoon or there’s jazz on a Friday night or there’s a farmers market that you love. I think those themes of belonging — a sense of place — are really starting to emerge as key ideas.”

In terms of retail, Tysons Corner Center, The Boro, and Tysons Galleria continue to be major destinations and are nearly back to pre-COVID visitation levels. While 56 percent of shoppers travel between 5 and 30 miles to Tysons, 27 percent come from more than 50 miles away.

“It is really known as a global destination for travel, tourism, and shopping for certain segments of people in different parts of the world,” Cristol says. “I think that’s been a long-standing strength of Tysons, and I think that’s going to be core to our recovery.”

Feature image of Perch Putt courtesy KGL Communications

This story originally ran in our October issue. For more stories like this, subscribe to Northern Virginia Magazine.

Apple Tysons Corner welcomes customers to a beautifully reimagined space

Apple Tysons Corner welcomes customers to a beautifully reimagined spaceApple’s first-ever retail location has a new home, featuring inclusive, innovative, and sustainable design enhancements that reflect Apple’s valuesToday, Apple Tysons Corner reopens in the heart of Fairfax County, Virginia. The Apple Store location opened its doors to customers 22 years ago on May 19, 2001, introducing the magic of Apple retail to the world. Apple has since opened over 500 Apple Store locations around the world.“Fro...

Apple Tysons Corner welcomes customers to a beautifully reimagined space

Apple’s first-ever retail location has a new home, featuring inclusive, innovative, and sustainable design enhancements that reflect Apple’s values

Today, Apple Tysons Corner reopens in the heart of Fairfax County, Virginia. The Apple Store location opened its doors to customers 22 years ago on May 19, 2001, introducing the magic of Apple retail to the world. Apple has since opened over 500 Apple Store locations around the world.

“From the moment we opened our first store at Tysons Corner in northern Virginia, we have prided ourselves on delivering an unparalleled retail experience where our customers can discover products and services that unlock creativity and empower them to do incredible things,” said Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO. “Today we’re thrilled to welcome customers to the beautifully reimagined Apple Tysons Corner.”

“For 22 years, we’ve been building and deepening relationships with our customers at Apple Tysons Corner, and we’re incredibly excited to invite the community to this beautiful new space where the best of Apple comes together,” said Deirdre O’Brien, Apple’s senior vice president of Retail. “Our team is ready to provide exceptional service and help everyone get the most out of Apple’s latest products and services.”

The Apple Retail Experience

Apple Tysons Corner customers will be supported by over 100 talented team members. The team is ready to help the local community discover and shop the iPhone 14 lineup, with its incredible camera capabilities, amazing battery life, and a groundbreaking suite of health and safety features.

Visitors can take a deeper look at the Apple Watch lineup in the newly designed avenue featuring a dedicated space for a more personalized shopping experience. The Genius Bar features a reimagined counter perfect for face-to-face conversations during hands-on technical and hardware support.

At Apple Tysons Corner, Today at Apple participants can explore the latest Apple products and learn how to get started on their new device. The free Apple-led programming includes:

Universal Design

Apple Tysons Corner is centered on universal design principles, creating an inviting space where everyone is welcome. The store offers varied table and seating heights, as well as access routes that give wheelchair users more space to navigate. For hearing aid users, the store offers a portable hearing loop that can be used anywhere. And at the Today at Apple table, an assistive listening loop gives them the chance to tune in to the session, offering a more accessible customer experience.

Sustainability in Stores

As part of Apple’s commitment to sustainability, Apple Tysons Corner has made significant reductions in petrochemical and carbon-intensive materials. The uniquely designed ceiling is made of biogenic acoustic panels and baffles, minimizing the dependency on metals, while the flooring is created with biopolymers, reducing the need for chemical resins. Like all Apple facilities, Apple Tysons Corner runs on 100 percent renewable energy and is carbon neutral.

516-Unit Affordable Housing Development In Tysons Breaks Ground

Local officials held a groundbreaking ceremony Tuesday for The Exchange at Spring Hill, a 516-unit affordable housing development in Tysons.|Updated Wed, Dec 20, 2023 at 3:50 pm ETTYSONS, VA — Fairfax County officials, business leaders, and affordable housing advocates gathered in Tysons Tuesday morning to break ground on The Exchange at Spring Hill Station. When completed, the 20-story mixed-use building will add 516 residential units to the county's affordable housing stock."This groundbreaking marks a sig...

Local officials held a groundbreaking ceremony Tuesday for The Exchange at Spring Hill, a 516-unit affordable housing development in Tysons.

|Updated Wed, Dec 20, 2023 at 3:50 pm ET

TYSONS, VA — Fairfax County officials, business leaders, and affordable housing advocates gathered in Tysons Tuesday morning to break ground on The Exchange at Spring Hill Station. When completed, the 20-story mixed-use building will add 516 residential units to the county's affordable housing stock.

"This groundbreaking marks a significant step forward in our commitment to providing affordable housing options at-scale in an area of incredible opportunity," said Carmen Romero, the CEO and president of affordable housing developer APAH. “The significance of this project is not lost on us — bringing the first 100 percent affordable deal to Tysons, a thriving, rapidly expanding community. The residents who will call The Exchange home will have access to a vibrant and rapidly growing community full of opportunity and resources. Yes, where you build matters, but who you build for matters just as much."

Located at short walk from Metro's Spring Hill Station, The Exchange will include 112 one-bedroom units, 306 two-bedroom units, and 98 three-bedroom units at different levels of affordability.

Area Median Income (AMI)30%50%60%$70
Equivalent Income$43,549$72,582$87,098$101,614
Number of units10012560116

The numbers in the table are based on the county's current AMI of $145,164, according to the Fairfax County Economic Development Authority.

“Despite its economic muscle, Tysons has remained out of reach for many who work here to also live here," Fairfax County Board of Supervisor Chair Jeff McKay said, stressing the importance of bringing affordable housing to Tysons. "That is why the groundbreaking of The Exchange at Spring Hill Metro is so important. We are providing homes for those who fuel the local economy. In order to remain the economic hub of Fairfax County, Tysons’ workers need to have the opportunity to live near where they work."

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The Exchange will also include 100 project-based voucher units and a 30,000-square-foot community center, operated by Fairfax County Neighborhood and Community Services. The facility will offer a basketball court, fitness center, and county-run programming that will be free and open to the public.

Hunter Mill Supervisor Walter Alcorn, whose district the building is located in, told Patch on Wednesday he was pleased that Tysons would be getting its first fully dedicated affordable housing community.

"This will not only provide needed housing for hundreds of working families, it will also mean a 30,000 sf Fairfax County community center – another first for Tysons that will be an amenity for future residents at the Exchange and also for the broader Tysons community," he said.

The Exchange at Spring Hill is being financed via two 4 percent Low Income Housing Credit loans. While Virginia Housing is providing a construction loan for permanent financing, Bank of America and Freddie Mac had teamed up to provide construction and permanent financing of more than. $227 million.

In addition, the Fairfax County Redevelopment Housing Authority issued bonds and the county was providing gap funding to pay for the land and lead the development of the community center.

“Affordable housing is a team sport," said FCHRA Chair Lenore Stanton. "The building materials for The Exchange at Spring Hill Metro include a wide variety of finance and development tools utilized by many partners and the FCRHA team. The result is a reimagination of this property into more than 500 new, affordable homes. But more than that, by co-locating the Tysons Community Center here, we are also building a place where people can come together to socialize and learn, within walking distance to the Metro station.”

An additional $89 million was being provided by the Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development Governor’s pool bond allocation, with the Virginia Housing Trust Fund and Housing Innovations in Energy Efficiency providing gap funding.

Thanks to a $56 million investment from Amazon’s Housing Equity Fund, APAH will be able to build all 516 apartments all at once, which should speed up the construction timeline. If all goes as planned, the project is expected to be completed in four years.

“As the first 100 percent affordable multifamily development in Tysons, The Exchange at Spring Hill Station will provide residents with easy access to transit, access to some of the best schools, jobs and amenities in the region, all in the highly desirable Tysons community,” said Senthil Sankaran, managing principal, Amazon Housing Equity Fund. “We’re grateful for the opportunity to collaborate with APAH, with Fairfax County, Virginia Housing and the Governor’s office to support the creation of 516 new, family-friendly affordable homes."

Caption:

From left, Tom Fleetwood, Fairfax County Redevelopment and Housing Authority; Bill Curtis, Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development; Tammy Neale, Virginia Housing; Chair Lenore Stanton, Fairfax County Redevelopment and Housing Authority; Supervisor Dalia A. Palchik, Providence District; Supervisor Walter L. Alcorn, Hunter Mill District; U.S. Congressman Connolly, Virginia’s 11th District; Carmen Romero, APAH; Senthil Sankaran, Amazon Housing Equity Fund; Larry Di Rita, Bank of America; Katie Cristol, Tysons Community Alliance; Matt Birenbaum, APAH Board.

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